8 Powerful Voices in Defense of Public Education – Diane Ravitch – Network For Public Education

Take 3 minutes to watch NPE President Diane Ravitch talk about how we can stop the steamroller that’s destroying our public schools – privatization.

Source: 8 Powerful Voices in Defense of Public Education – Diane Ravitch – Network For Public Education

DISCLAIMER: I’m subscribed to her education blog and think the world of her! 

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Marcus Welby M.D. had it right all along

marcus_welby_intro_screenFor those too young to remember, this was an ABC series that ran from 1969-1976. Though the program had house calls as part of its outreach, this was not the main point of the series. Having said that, wise people understand what is old tends to come back as new again to a different audience. With Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) announcement (PDF) of Medicare-for-all sponsored legislation being first an impetus to cover everyone with healthcare and second to do so cheaper than the current system, all opportunities to flip the current fee-for-service payment model are welcome; that is if your ox is not gored by doing so. Right now, the throwback concept of House Calls is limited to the most intensive patient care clients, as is the case with most test programs. Hey, it’s 2017, it is known what works and what doesn’t by now; let’s just get on with it.

Personally, I have a chronic leg situation that has alternating bouts of treatment. If home visits from Nurse Practitioners at a minimum and Doctor’s based on need were truly funded, the system and my condition would be greatly improved.

This is not an isolated cause, despite it being new to me. Another organization in Virginia is employing a provision of the Affordable Care Act named Independence at Home. It is a project that involves 14 practices and consortia with the closest branch being a group in Durham (NC). A team-based approach to care that involves physician assistants, pharmacists, social workers, and other staff (Daniel Farmer, 2016), I would be interested to know what the other staff is; one way it can be enhanced is the utilization of Electronic Health Records that are clean and functional.

via Bringing Back House Calls to Cut Spending on High-Risk Patients

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Some say people on disability just need to get back to work. It’s not that easy.

Some say people on disability just need to get back to work. It’s not that easy.

The Washington Post does an excellent job covering this topic. This blog has alluded to one of their stories specifically on this matter. DISCLAIMER: I am a paying subscriber to the Washington Post national digital edition.

One of the overriding themes of this blog is an advocacy for a Universal Basic Income that is coupled with Universal Health Care. It shouldn’t take a natural disaster such as Hurricane/Tropical Storm Harvey to realize that everyone deserves a place and feeling that they are not abandoned or uncared for, not to mention unloved.

Lisa Daunhauer wanted to be one of the few to get off benefits. But first, she had to succeed at Walmart.

Source: Some say people on disability just need to get back to work. It’s not that easy.

EHR & our healthcare system, match made somewhere?

EHR & our healthcare system, match made somewhere?

Electronic Health Records are a good thing, except when they are not. Being disabled, medical professionals are a major part of my life. Interactions with them, for the most part, can’t be avoided. I consider myself a geek and reasonably wise to electronic communication means. I even have a working knowledge of HIPAA and all that entails. Coming to grips with the utter lack of EHR implementation at the consumer level is difficult to deal with. One of the providers has a reasonably popular medical specific web portal. It’s not very functional, but it exists. Another group is part of the region’s largest system. My mind struggles with the concept of a total lack of confidence in modern medical communications and associated technology. Having a secure HIPAA compliant communication portal, app, or even Whatsapp, which is 100% encrypted, suitable for transferring files that can be imported into the record keeping that all facilities are mandated by law to control. As the nation nudges toward a single payer system, despite current politics, inefficiencies become sore wounds and costly. The lack of portable EHR with a common format for the secure interchange of data will come back and bite the clients who are in no position to weather the outcomes. Nobody, not even TPTB, wins in that environment.

Recently, I had a doctors appointment with my family physician. What is interesting about this event? He carried a tablet with a keyboard dock with him as he discusses with the patient. All of our conversations are transcribed and available for reference. The rest of the office only has the standard technologies; desktop computers, printers, faxes, that sort of thing. I printed out the most recent list of medications, and the staff either scanned or typed the information in their systems; couldn’t tell which, and it didn’t occur to me to ask.

As I was researching this post, there are few events in life that haven’t happened to someone else, this being no exception. As early as five years ago, this entered my view:

Healthcare facilities need to work with providers to make it easy for them to deliver excellent care. This includes having ready, instant, and continuous access to complete patient records – access resulting from compatible EHR systems and dependable computer networks. Standards must be set and enforced that allow compatibility across systems. A start has been made in this direction, but it needs to progress quickly yet carefully (Tong, 2012)

If any of my interactions are any guide, these lessons were not learned nor executed. And that is a shame really. Anything close to a potential utopian solution must have the free and fair interchange of Electronic Health Records while automating as much of the nonclinical minutiae of the American Health Care system; even if it remains a continuation of the Affordable Care Act.

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How Wi-Fi could get a boost from Li-Fi

I have previously written about this technology and haven’t got much of it lately until now. This time it’s being marketed as a compliment to 4G/5G and WiFi, not a replacement. What comes to mind is the “complementary” nature of Bluetooth and WiFi.  To explain from Wikipedia:

Bluetooth is a wireless technology standard for exchanging data over short distances (using short-wavelength UHF radio wavesin the ISM band from 2.4 to 2.485 GHz[4]) from fixed and mobile devices, and building personal area networks (PANs) (“Bluetooth,” 2017)

As Bluetooth come to mind, the IEEE working group associated with this also sees LiFi as a Personal Area Network (“IEEE 802.15.13 Task Group,” 2017). For this technology to take off, the current usage of Compact Fluorescent Lamps would have to give way to LED light bulbs. The transition from Incandescent light bulbs isn’t fully complete so this could be a while, compounded by the current Administration and their views on such energy advances.

Source: How Wi-Fi could get a boost from Li-Fi

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Mayoral candidate Ingrid Lafleur proposes a universal basic income for Detroit – The Michigan Chronicle

Ingrid LaFleur –PHOTO CREDIT: Justin Millhouse

H/T Scott Santens via Twitter.

I really like the idea of a citywide Universal Basic Income. Half regular money $1000 and half cryptocurrency $1000.

A cryptocurrency (or crypto currency) is a medium of exchange using cryptography to secure the transactions and to control the creation of new units. Cryptocurrencies are a subset of alternative currencies, or specifically of digital currencies. Bitcoin became the first decentralized cryptocurrency in 2009. Since then, numerous cryptocurrencies have been created.

WikiPedia

The current Federal Poverty Level is $1,005 monthly per person and $348.33 additional person. This means that the FPL will be covered, and the D-Coin concept takes care of city services and businesses as it is basically the modern version of scrip. This past weekend, I spent quality time with family members who live in and around Detroit at a family function; The direct topic did not arise, but attempting to catch up with Mom’s side of the family, Detroit’s renaissance was a topic. Doubts about the veracity of it were communicated, but we shall see where it lands.

via Ingrid Lafleur proposes a universal basic income for Detroit | The Michigan Chronicle

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