PyDev of the Week: Lance Bragstad | The Mouse Vs. The Python

PyDev of the Week: Lance Bragstad | The Mouse Vs. The Python

This week we welcome Lance Bragstad (@LanceBragstad) as our PyDev of the Week! Lance is a core developer of the OpenStack project. You can find out more about his passions via his website or his Github profile. Let’s spend some time getting to know Lance!

 

Can you tell us a little about yourself (hobbies, education, etc):

 

In 2012, I graduated with a degree in Computer Science from North Dakota State University, located in Fargo (yup, like the movie). Since then I’ve become more and more passionate about open-source software. I spend most of my time in the OpenStack ecosystem.

 

Besides being passionate about open-source software, I’m an avid outdoorsman. My wife and I train for running events together. I also donate time as a volunteer firefighter for our community of about 700 people.

 

Why did you start using Python?

 

After I graduated college, I started working at IBM building an OpenStack distribution. Since OpenStack is written in Python, learning Python was a requirement, and that’s how I was introduced to the language. Despite being given the opportunity to use different languages in college, I never really experimented with Python. Using it in a new setting with a new job was an exciting learning experience.

 

What projects are you working on now?

 

Currently, I spend the majority of my time working within OpenStack’s authentication and authorization realm. There is a dedicated identity service, called keystone, along with several libraries that orchestrate authorization across OpenStack.

 

Since there are many ways to approach identity management, it’s interesting to work on the piece that handles all of that. Keystone can be used to manage users with MySQL. It can also be configured to use LDAP or even identity providers that issue SAML assertions or use OpenID Connect.

 

The other exciting part is that OpenStack services offer such a rich set of APIs to users. Since services consume authorization information from keystone, keystone has to support protecting all of those APIs, which presents an interesting set of problems to solve.

 

 

from The Mouse Vs. The Python http://bit.ly/2sqpDi3

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Alabama, backward as usual.

Being from Alabama and not living there now, this doesn’t surprise me. Fortunately, when I lived there, I lived in counties with medical facilities and doctors. Even when I went to high school had at the time 2 hospitals. There is 1 there now.

Today in Technology: The top 10 tech issues for 2019 | Microsoft on the Issues

By Brad Smith and Carol Ann Browne

This past year we’ve addressed some of history’s most important innovations in our Today in Technology blog and video series. Our focus is always on what we can learn from the past and apply to today’s issues.

Today we look back at more recent history – the past 12 months, to be exact. It was a momentous year for technology, with the phrase “Techlash” commonly used to refer not just to one but several issues which gave the public pause about the role of technology and the tech sector in people’s lives. As the calendar turns to 2019, we consider what the last year will likely mean to what will surely be an important new year. Here’s our list of 10 developments to think about.

1. PRIVACY: Privacy protection deepens in Europe and spreads to the United States

2. DISINFORMATION: The controversy roils social media

3. PROTECTIONISM IN THE PACIFIC: Tech comes between the United States and China

4. DIGITAL DIPLOMACY: Multi-stakeholder efforts start addressing cyberattacks

5. ETHICS CHALLENGES FOR AI: New controversies abound amidst employee activism

6. AI AND THE ECONOMY: Concerns spread about AI and jobs

7. THE PEOPLE SIDE OF TECHNOLOGY: Immigration and diversity remain front and center

8. RURAL BROADBAND: Some progress amidst problems

9. SOVEREIGNTY, HUMAN RIGHTS AND THE CLOUD: Protecting people in a data-driven world

10. TECH GROWTH AND COMMUNITIES: What’s good for tech companies can challenge a community

Read our full analysis here: https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/today-technology-top-10-tech-issues-2019-brad-smith/?published=t

The post Today in Technology: The top 10 tech issues for 2019 appeared first on Microsoft on the Issues.

PyDev of the Week: Kushal Das | The Mouse Vs. The Python

PyDev of the Week: Kushal Das | The Mouse Vs. The Python

This week we welcome Kushal Das (@kushaldas) as our PyDev of the Week! Kushal is a core developer of the Python programming language and a co-author of PEP 582. You can learn more about Kushal by checking out his blog or his Github profile. Let’s take a few moments to get to know Kushal better!

Can you tell us a little about yourself (hobbies, education, etc):

 

I am a staff member of Freedom of the Press Foundation. We are a non-profit that protects, defends, and empowers public-interest journalism in the 21st century. We work on encryption tools for journalists and whistleblowers, documentation of attacks on the press, training newsrooms on digital security practices, and advocating for the the public’s right to know.

 

I am also part of various Free Software projects through out my life. I am a core developer of CPython, and a director of the Python Software Foundation. I am part of the core team of the Tor project. I am a regular contributor to Fedora Project for over a decade now.

 

Why did you start using Python?

 

I started learning Python at the end of 2005. I wanted to write code for my new Nokia phone and Sirtaj Singh Kang suggested me to start learning Python for the same. While doing so I found that I had to write much less number of lines of code and also it was much easier to understand. I started talking more with the wider Python community over Internet and that hooked me into it more. As Brett Cannon said: “Came for the language, stayed for the community.” is true for many of us.

 

What other programming languages do you know and which is your favorite?

 

Through out my programming life, I kept learning a new language in every 8 months to a year. Before I started writing Python, I used to write C/Java/PHP based on what I was working on. Around 2009 I started spending time with functional programming, and loved Lisp a lot. I spent around a year to keep writing more Lisp and was trying to figure out how to use the ideas from there in my daily Python programming life. From 2013 I started writing Go and I do have many projects written in Go. But, lately I am writing more and more of Rust. I really like the community and also the compiler 🙂

 

via The Mouse Vs. The Python

Finally, the wider employment market understands the real for the AARP generation.

Finally, the wider employment market understands how much the AARP generation has toiled in silence. 💯

Fuchsia Friday: The mystery of Dragonglass in Android, Chromium, and Fuchsia – 9to5Google

Granted, my ongoing interest is a mobile platform not tied to any legacy system, unlike Android (Java) or iOS (Objective-C); this proves how difficult to design a modern OS and make it all work. Sometimes it may be better not to re-invent the wheel here, but what do I know?

Earlier this week, we reported that just about everything we’ve seen about Fuchsia is now gone, as the “Armadillo” UI has been deleted. In its place, we only have references to what seems, in context, to be three other “shells” or user interfaces which are all kept closed-source by Google. However, one of these, “Dragonglass,” may offer more answers than we initially thought.

Source: Fuchsia Friday: The mystery of Dragonglass in Android, Chromium, and Fuchsia – 9to5Google

PyDev of the Week: Mike Grouchy |The Mouse Vs. The Python

PyDev of the Week: Mike Grouchy |The Mouse Vs. The Python

May the glorious of New Years be upon the fans of this blog and everyone else as well.

This week we welcome Mike Grouchy (@mgrouchy) as our PyDev of the Week. Mike co-founded PyCoder’s Weekly along with Mahdi Yusuf (@myusuf3). He is also the creator of Django Stronghold, a fun Django package you should check out. Let’s take a few moments to get to know Mike better!

 

Can you tell us a little about yourself (hobbies, education, etc):

 

I currently work as the VP of Engineering at a Startup called PageCloud I am also one of the co-founders/creators/curators of Pycoders Weekly a weekly Python newsletter. As for my background, I’m from St.Johns Newfoundland on the east coast of Canada. I got a BSc in computer science at Memorial University there and then moved to Ottawa, Ontario after that to work (a short stint working in the Canadian government and startups since).

 

Why did you start using Python?

 

I played around with Python a little bit in my teen years writing little scripts for automating things and whatnot but I started to get into Python seriously working at my university in the computer science department.

 

What other programming languages do you know and which is your favorite?

 

Python is definitely my favorite language (and the one I am best at) but I have professionally written C, C++, C#, java, VB, JavaScript. I have also dabbled a bit with plenty of other languages but my experience is so small they aren’t even worth calling out.

 

from The Mouse Vs. The Python