How virtual reality (VR) is improving end-of-life care

I think this is a great idea and should spread to the states. In your final days, happiness is beyond deserved, it is required. As this is cutting edge technology, not a lot of published journals or even popular media exist on the subject. Most of what is found currently deals with telehealth and remote monitoring. Patients and caregivers alike seek remote mutual support from others who are coping with a terminal illness (Demiris, Oliver, & Wittenberg-Lyles, 2011). Where VR fits this scenario is to provide experiences that can be shared with a support network similar to the description in the previous sentence. At this stage, VR is a near exclusive on-premise function that can be administered by allied health personnel, not necessarily nurses unless there is a problem.

 

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H /T ZDNet UK  – Loros

 

“In the UK, terminally ill patients are being transported from the hospice to other worlds.”

How virtual reality is improving end-of-life care | ZDNet


Demiris, G., Oliver, D. P., & Wittenberg-Lyles, E. (2011). Technologies to Support End of Life Care. Seminars in Oncology Nursing, 27(3), 211–217. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.soncn.2011.04.006

ANU lens turns smartphone cameras into microscopes – Fertile Mind

This is exciting.

Source: ANU lens turns smartphone cameras into microscopes – Fertile Mind – Medium

I published this story to Medium about 3 years ago when it was written from ZDNet. Relevancy and freshness of content are important to me while transitioning to active blogging. A mere two years later, Doctoral students at the same University in Austrailia took the lens into microscope discovery and ran with it for a new application. The detection of water quality based on a droplet onto a smartphone attached lens, rendered in software. In the piece, the group focused on developing country travelers using this as part of their acclimation to the new surroundings. “The idea is that tourists headed to developing countries can pick up a bunch of these lenses at the airport and when they are unsure of water-quality, they can test samples of their water by placing drops on top of the lens, which links to their smartphone camera.” as quoted by John Rivers from the Research School of Biology at Austrailian National University (“ANU Students Win In Australian-French Entrepreneurship Challenge | ANU Science”). This needs to be applied to communities such as Flint MI and East Chicago IN.smartphonelensimageHere is an example of a smartphone lens microscope that was discovered. Having published a blog post on a similar subject has expanded the uses for this technology to very relevant fields.


web.science@anu.edu.au. (2016, June 10). ANU students win in Australian-French Entrepreneurship Challenge. Retrieved April 19, 2017, from http://science.anu.edu.au/news-events/news/anu-students-win-australian-french-entrepreneurship-challenge

Smartphones to become pocket doctors after scientists discover camera flash and microphone can be used to diagnose illness

I’m all for this, especially if it’s covered by Medicare and most major insurances. Anything that puts more controls in the hands of patients that want it, and saves medical costs as well can not be a bad thing.

Smartphones will soon become mobile laboratories which can monitor bone density, calculate red blood cell levels and even predict if an asthma attack is imminent.

Source: Smartphones to become pocket doctors after scientists discover camera flash and microphone can be used to diagnose illness

Photo Security and HIPAA

HIPAAThis was a story that I did on the subject of HIPAA, but was never published at the original time. As about a year has passed, the volume of data has increased significantly, which shows no sign of abating. With big data and artificial intelligence being current buzzwords, lest we do not forget the compliance issues that are involved. Both of the main cloud providers, Amazon Web Services (Manager & lowella@amazon.com, 2017, p. 5) and Azure (Stevan D. Vidich, 2014, p. 2), are both HIPAA compliant right out of the box. This is not to exclude other providers, but they are the main players in mindshare and marketshare. Amazon is the clear dominant leader  (Joe Panettieri, 2017, para. 4), but Microsoft can never be counted out.


Joe Panettieri. (2017, February 9). Cloud Market Share 2017: Amazon AWS, Microsoft Azure, IBM, Google. Retrieved April 18, 2017, from https://www.channele2e.com/2017/02/09/cloud-market-share-2017-amazon-microsoft-ibm-google/

Manager, & lowella@amazon.com. (2017, March 25). HIPAA Compliance – Amazon Web Services (AWS). Retrieved April 18, 2017, from //aws.amazon.com/compliance/hipaa-compliance/

Stevan D. Vidich. (2014, April 22). Microsoft Trust Center | HIPAA and the HITECH Act. Retrieved April 18, 2017, from https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/TrustCenter/Compliance/HIPAA