PyDev of the Week: Neil Muller

PyDev of the Week: Neil Muller

This week we welcome Neil Muller as our PyDev of the Week! Neil is an organizer for Cape Town Python User Group and PyCon ZA. He also speaks at conferences! You can learn more about his open source projects over on Github. Let’s take a few moments to get to know Neil better!

Can you tell us a little about yourself (hobbies, education, etc):

 

I’m an Applied Mathematician with interests in image processing and numerical computation, currently living and working in the Cape Town area, South Africa. I followed an interest in facial recognition into a PhD from the University of Stellenbosch, and that led to working on a variety of image processing and numerical modelling problems at iThemba LABS.

 

These days I split my working time between iThemba LABS and Praelexis, a machine learning company (mainly using Python) in Stellenbosch.

 

In my spare time, I am obsessed with board and card games, especially Vampire: The Eternal Struggle.

 

Why did you start using Python?

 

I first used Python in 1997 to solve a simple text processing problem while working on my Masters thesis. I liked the language, but I was still mainly a Matlab user at the time and so I didn’t really touch Python again until around 2004, when several of my friends and colleagues started getting really interested in the language and encouraged me to revisit it. I rapidly fell in love with the large standard library and the developing scientific computing stack. By 2005, it had replaced Matlab as my go-to tool for experimenting with problems.

 

What other programming languages do you know and which is your favorite?

 

Other than Python, I do a fair amount of work with C and C++, and also do a bit of JavaScript and shell scripting. In the past, I’ve worked extensively with Matlab, done some PHP and a bit of Fortran.

 

Python is my favourite language. The saying “Python Fits Your Brain” is true for me – I like the syntax and expressiveness of the language, and find it a very powerful tool for modelling and understanding whatever problem I’m trying to solve. While it’s not always part of the final solution to a given problem, it’s almost always part of getting there.

 

Thanks for doing the interview, Neil!

from The Mouse Vs. The Python http://bit.ly/2VxTPYK

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s