Microsoft releases biannual digital trust reports | Microsoft on the Issues

Microsoft releases biannual digital trust reports | Microsoft on the Issues

Microsoft has released its latest biannual digital trust reports on the Microsoft Reports Hub. These reports consist of the Law Enforcement Requests Report, U.S. National Security Orders Report and Content Removal Request Reports.  We continue to strive towards building and maintaining trust in technology, and we know that transparency is a key component to that trust. Our digital trust reports are intended to help our customers understand how Microsoft responds to government and law enforcement requests for data and for content removal…

Law Enforcement Requests

The Law Enforcement Requests Report encompassing the period from January to June 2019 remains largely consistent with previous reports…

U.S. National Security Orders

The U.S. National Security Orders Report, which encompass the period from July to December 2018,  is largely consistent with the previous reports:..

Content Removal Requests

The latest Content Removal Request Reports details acceptance rates regarding requests received from governments, copyright holders, individuals subject to the European Union’s “Right to be Forgotten” ruling and victims of non-consensual pornography…

Looking ahead

In recent months, Microsoft has been working with civil society, governments and other technology companies to collectively implement the Christchurch Call to Action and to evolve the Global Internet Forum to Counter Terrorism (GIFCT). As part of our commitment to these initiatives, among others, that require public disclosure of how we are handling terrorist and violent extremist content, we will conduct multi-stakeholder consultations and other efforts to identify and make available additional information via our digital trust reports.

We will provide an update on progress in the next digital trust report in the spring of 2020.

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Recognizing our law firms for diversity progress and innovation | Microsoft on the Issues

Recognizing our law firms for diversity progress and innovation | Microsoft on the Issues

At Microsoft, we recognize that the business we transact with our supplier base can make a material impact in fostering greater levels of diversity in their various industries. That’s why last year Microsoft spent more than $2.9 billion working with suppliers who are minority-, disabled-, veteran-, LGBTQ+, and woman-owned businesses.

In 2008, we created our Law Firm Diversity Program (LFDP) to foster collaboration with our law firm partners to help increase diversity in the legal profession. We built the LFDP around three enduring principles: (1) diversity (both within Microsoft’s legal department and at our partner firms) leads to better business outcomes; (2) accountability can accelerate progress; and (3) working together collaboratively on diversity is necessary to us make real and enduring progress. Our initial program focused on financially rewarding our partner firms for increasing diversity at their firms overall, with diversity being defined broadly to include women and racial and ethnic minorities, individuals identifying as LGBTQ+, people with disabilities and veterans. In 2015, we evolved the program to focus on increasing diversity in firm leadership, including in the firms’ management committees, partnership and partners working on Microsoft work…

Expanding our Law Firm Diversity Program to recognize innovation in diversity programs

While we applaud the progress that has been made, we also recognize that there is still much to do. The legal profession continues to lag behind other industries and the diversity of our communities overall, whether for women, minorities or other diverse groups. Ongoing progress will require us to think more broadly than diversity metrics alone…

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New cyberattacks targeting sporting and anti-doping organizations | Microsoft on the Issues

New cyberattacks targeting sporting and anti-doping organizations | Microsoft on the Issues

Today we’re sharing that the Microsoft Threat Intelligence Center has recently tracked significant cyberattacks originating from a group we call Strontium, also known as Fancy Bear/APT28, targeting anti-doping authorities and sporting organizations around the world. As the world looks forward with anticipation to the Tokyo Summer Games in 2020, we thought it important to share information about this new round of activity.

At least 16 national and international sporting and anti-doping organizations across three continents were targeted in these attacks which began September 16th, just before news reports about new potential action being taken by the World Anti-Doping Agency. Some of these attacks were successful, but the majority were not. Microsoft has notified all customers targeted in these attacks and has worked with those who have sought our help to secure compromised accounts or systems.

This is not the first time Strontium has targeted such organizations. The group reportedly released medical records and emails taken from sporting organizations and anti-doping officials in 2016 and 2018, resulting in a 2018 indictment in federal court in the United States…

You can protect yourself from these types of attacks in at least three ways. We recommend, first, that you enable two-factor authentication on all business and personal email accounts. Second, learn how to spot phishing schemes and protect yourself from them. Third, enable security alerts about links and files from suspicious websites.

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PyDev of the Week: David Fischer | The Mouse vs The Python

PyDev of the Week: David Fischer | The Mouse vs The Python

This week we welcome David Fischer (@djfische) as our PyDev of the Week! David is an organizer of the San Diego Python user’s group. He also works for Read the Docs. You can see what David has been up to on his website or check out what he’s been up to on Github. Let’s take a few moments to get to know David better!

Can you tell us a little about yourself (hobbies, education, etc):

I am one of the organizers of the San Diego Python meetup and I’ve been doing that since early 2012, but my hobbies nowadays mostly involve spending time with my 3 year old daughter. I also really enjoy games of all kinds from in-person board and card games to computer games and my daughter is just about the right age to start introducing this stuff.

I have a bachelor’s degree in applied math and despite the name that involved a lot of programming. Mostly I learned Java in college which outside of some Android development I’ve barely used since.

For work, I previously worked at Qualcomm, Amazon, and a beer-tech related startup (how San Diego!). I currently work on Read the Docs. I’ve had the opportunity to work on lots of different things from web apps, mobile apps, technical sales/marketing, scalability, security, and privacy. I don’t want to rule out working for big companies, but the small company life seems like a better fit for me.

Perhaps this comes out of some of my security and privacy work, but I try not to participate much on social media. I was surprised to be contacted to do this interview because I think of myself as having a pretty low profile in the Python community outside of San Diego. I’m happy to do it, though.

Why did you start using Python?

I first learned Python in a college class where we had a project in a new programming language every 3 weeks or so. We also learned JavaScript, a Lisp-like language called ML, and Prolog. My opinions on programming weren’t very well formed back then but I remember really liking Python relative to the others. I think I was using Python 2.3 or maybe a 2.4 beta version. The Python docs were much more brightly colored back then.

I didn’t do any Python after that for around 4-5 years but I came back to it when I needed to create something that ended up like a bad version of mitmproxy (although mitmproxy didn’t exist yet). I really enjoyed working on that project and in Python and this is probably the only time this has happened to me but I remember looking up from my work and it was after midnight. I hadn’t eaten dinner and everybody else at work had gone home hours ago. I was hooked and I’ve been doing mostly Python ever since.

What other programming languages do you know and which is your favorite?

It’s been about a decade now, but I was a professional PHP developer for a few years. Sometimes, the language gets a bad reputation in the Python community but I always thought it was alright and it does have some areas the Python ecosystem could learn from. Today, I mostly work in Python with some JavaScript. Python is definitely my favorite.

Thanks for doing the interview, David!

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Microsoft + The Jackson Laboratory: Using AI to fight cancer

Microsoft + The Jackson Laboratory: Using AI to fight cancer
Microsoft/YouTube Video Screengrab

Biomedical researchers are embracing artificial intelligence to accelerate the implementation of cancer treatments that target patients’ specific genomic profiles, a type of precision medicine that in some cases is more effective than traditional chemotherapy and has fewer side effects.

Curating CKB

Mockus and her colleagues are using Microsoft’s machine reading technology to curate CKB, which stores structured information about genomic mutations that drive cancer, drugs that target cancer genes and the response of patients to those drugs.

Self supervision

To be successful, Poon and his team need to train machine learning models in such a way that they catch all the potentially relevant information – ensure there are no gaps in content – and, at the same time, weed out irrelevant information sufficiently to make the curation process more efficient.

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How and why Microsoft should bring a Windows 10X-powered ‘phone’ to market is a certified Warditorial

How and why Microsoft should bring a Windows 10X-powered ‘phone’ to market is a certified Warditorial

Mr. Ward has been consistent in his call for a Windows mobile device for years. It looks like an indirect way of getting there through Android. I expect a migration path to Windows 10 while having choice in devices.


Balls and Strikes from me…

I believe Microsoft is still pursuing its Pocket PC vision with plans to bring a Windows 10X-powered Surface Duo-like device to our pockets in the future. And building developer relationships through Android is key.

In January 2015, I presented an analysis claiming Microsoft would bring an inking focused, telephony-powered pocketable PC to market. I even suggested Microsoft-branded earpieces would be a practical accessory for this device. In 2016 leaks regarding Project Andromeda, a Windows Core OS-powered (or Windows 10X) pocket PC, confirmed this analysis. As information continued to surface, I incorporated those details into my ongoing analysis of Microsoft’s Pocket PC mobile strategy.

Microsoft has sought to converge the power of Windows and the broader Microsoft cloud, apps, hardware, and services ecosystem on a pocketable telephony-enabled mobile device for years. Windows Mobile, Windows Phone, and Windows 10 Mobile were all mobile OSes that flirted with Microsoft’s mobile vision but failed to bring the “power” of Windows and the synergy of Microsoft’s ecosystem to a touch-focused mobile experience. Thus, Microsoft designed the modular, lighter and context-conforming Windows 10X, for duo screen PCS like Surface Neo (a versatile tablet) and partner devices from Dell, HP, and Lenovo coming next year. It was even planned to power the now Android-based Surface Duo (a pocketable device), formerly known as Project Andromeda…

Related

Microsoft invited me to its biggest Surface event ever — and it was AWESOME!
Surface Neo and Duo: First Impressions from our hands on

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Happening now 90 mi NE of here.

Happening now 90 mi NE of here.

It should be noted that the US Congresswoman mentioned in this story, @Alma Adams, is originally from High Point. When NC-12 was re-drawn, it became essentially Charlotte only, so now she lives here and represents me in Congress.

‘I have dyslexia’: A chief engineer spoke up to help others with learning disabilities

‘I have dyslexia’: A chief engineer spoke up to help others with learning disabilities

I am a member of the Windows Insider program, albeit not as active as some others, so I quite familiar with Ms. Dona Sarkar, who was the Chief Ninja Cat and fearless leader. Filed under “I did not know this”, these types of secrets that most of us have and not shared are ultimately doing a disservice to ourselves and our fellow humans. I would Fist Bump her if she ever came to the Charlotte offices of Microsoft and we got a chance to chat.

Last year, Sarkar began talking about another subject important to her: dyslexia. She was diagnosed five years ago, after struggling to read an eye chart. It turned out to be the reason why she always dreaded reading aloud in school. It’s why she often transposes letters and numbers, especially in sequences like flight and tracking numbers. And it’s why charts, graphs and metrics reports are sometimes challenging to read at work.


“When I see 10 numbers on a slide with percentages and line charts, they all start swimming together,” Sarkar says.


Lately, Sarkar has started talking about her disability on stage. At a Microsoft Ninja camp for teens with disabilities, she demo’d how she uses Immersive Reader, Focus Mode and other Office tools to manage her reading. At the company’s ninth annual Ability Summit, she told an internal audience of more than 1,500 people about her dyslexia.


‘I have dyslexia’: A chief engineer spoke up to help others with learning disabilities is the sourcing behind this post.

PyDev of the Week: Sophy Wong | The Mouse vs The Python

PyDev of the Week: Sophy Wong | The Mouse vs The Python

This week we welcome Sophy Wong (@sophywong) as our PyDev of the Week! Sophy is a maker who uses Circuit Python for creating wearables. She is also a writer and speaker at Maker events. You can see some of her creations on her Youtube Channel or her website. Let’s take a few moments to get to know her better!

Sophy's LED Manicure

Can you tell us a little about yourself (hobbies, education, etc):

I am a designer and maker currently working mostly with wearable electronics projects. My background is in graphic design, and I have also worked in fashion and costumes on my way to wearable electronics. I like to explore the different ways people interact with technology, and much of my work is inspired by sci-fi and pop culture. My projects often combine technology, like microcontrollers and 3D printing, with hand crafts like sculpting, painting, and sewing.

Why did you start using Python?

I discovered Python through Adafruit’s development of Circuit Python. Adafruit’s thorough documentation and huge library of tutorial projects make it easy for me to learn and write code for my projects. I’m primarily a designer, and code is a tool I use to bring my ideas to life. Circuit Python helps me learn programming basics, and is also powerful enough to support more complex projects as I gain more skills.

What other programming languages do you know and which is your favorite?

I also use Arduino for some projects, which lets me use the many fantastic Arduino libraries out there, like FastLED. I often use MakeCode when creating a project for a tutorial or educational workshop. As a visual programming tool, MakeCode is intuitive to use and easy to explain with screenshots. It’s still robust enough to support fairly complex projects, and is a great first step before going further with Circuit Python or Arduino.

Thanks for doing the interview, Sophy!

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Sometimes the truth hurts, but the hope is that a collective we is grown enough to hear and understand.

Sometimes the truth hurts, but the hope is that a collective we is grown enough to hear and understand.

Featured image screenshot courtesy of @NowThisNews via @Twitter

Microsoft AI for education in the EU 🇪🇺 for everybody

I have been known to have a US centric Carolinas point of view. That would be improper to not recognize what’s happening halfway around the world.

TechSpark Fargo: Grand Farm project will create the farm of the future | Microsoft on the Issues

TechSpark Fargo: Grand Farm project will create the farm of the future | Microsoft on the Issues

For generations, farmers throughout North Dakota have traditionally hired seasonal farm hands to help with planting, harvesting and other jobs. Digital technologies and big data are transforming agriculture. Today, those same farmers need to hire technologists, programmers and data scientists to improve productivity to meet food demands, boost yields to increase profitability, environmentally sustain the land and improve safety. But, according to the consulting firm Accenture, less than 20 percent of acreage today is managed using digital ag tech.

Grand Farm
In West Coast tech corridors 1,800 miles away, technologists, entrepreneurs and venture capitalists are coming up with their next big ag tech ideas. But too often those ideas are disconnected from the farmers, ranchers and agribusinesses the technology is meant to help. We believe meaningful innovation will happen when farmers are a part of the solution.

Drone investment
Our TechSpark signature investment in the Grand Farm will leverage projects like a TechSpark North Dakota investment we made earlier this year in unmanned aircraft systems (UAS), which most people know as drones, to provide access to low-cost aerial data imagery. Gov. Burgum, local businesses, universities and economic development organizations in North Dakota have an ambition to be the epicenter of U.S. drone innovation and entrepreneurism.We also plan on leveraging Microsoft technologies like those used in FarmBeats at the Grand Farm. FarmBeats uses AI in data-driven farming to augment human knowledge and help increase farm productivity and decrease costs. It uses inexpensive IoT sensors, drones, low-cost broadband connectivity using TV white spaces, and vision and machine learning algorithms to help maximize the use of agricultural land. FarmBeats gives farmers precise information about soil temperatures and soil moisture so they know exactly when the best times are for planting, watering and fertilizing, as well as the precise amount of water and fertilizer needed.

Rural broadband
Getting data from the farm is extremely difficult given there is often no broadband available on many farms. In the U.S., more than 19 million people living in rural America don’t have access to broadband internet. The farm of the future requires rural broadband.

Digital skills and employability
Ag tech innovation and broadband-connected farms require the right talent – people who know how to create and use new ag technology.

This starts with students in the region, who need the opportunity to study computer science in high school if they are to succeed in the digital era. But only 45 percent of U.S. high schools teach computer science, according to the nonprofit Code.org. Microsoft’s Technology and Literacy in Schools (TEALS) program is helping schools across the nation and British Columbia build their own computer science programs through partnerships between teachers and volunteers from the technology sector.

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Microsoft and Nuance team up on ‘exam room of the future’ to end doctor burnout | GeekWire

Microsoft and Nuance team up on ‘exam room of the future’ to end doctor burnout | GeekWire

As I am getting prepared to go see my doctor this afternoon (EDT) this blog post caught my attention. This is the type of story not necessarily expected from this publisher, but it does have a connection to their beat, being Microsoft. I have asked the Dr. about this and he admits that the paperwork part is the least favorite aspect of the job and not what he signed up for. The EHR system at his medical facility needs either serious work or a better buy-in.

Microsoft is teaming up with Nuance Communications to revamp hospital exam rooms with artificial intelligence and natural language processing, creating technology that will help clinicians spend less time documenting interactions with patients — a well-known source of burnout among health workers.

Studies have found that doctors spend more than half their day interacting with the electronic health record (EHR). And more than two-thirds of physicians say that medical record documentation contributes greatly to burnout.

Source: Microsoft and Nuance team up on ‘exam room of the future’ to end doctor burnout

UPDATE

This is near straight from the ultimate source, and published after the original post.

A new strategic partnership between Microsoft and Nuance Communications Inc. announced today will work to accelerate and deliver this level of ambient clinical intelligence to exam rooms, allowing ambient sensing and conversational AI to take care of some of the more burdensome administrative tasks and to provide clinical documentation that writes itself. That, in turn, will allow doctors to turn their attention fully to taking care of patients.

Of course, there are still immense technical challenges to getting to that ideal scenario of the future. But the companies say they believe that they already have a strong foundation in features from Nuance’s ambient clinical intelligence (ACI) technology unveiled earlier this year and Microsoft’s Project EmpowerMD Intelligent Scribe Service. Both are using AI technologies to learn how to convert doctor-patient conversations into useful clinical documentation, potentially reducing errors, saving doctors’ time and improving the overall physician experience.

https://blogs.microsoft.com/ai/nuance-exam-room-of-the-future/

Do Video Telehealth Requirements Curtail Access in Rural States? | mHEALTHINTELLIGENCE

Do Video Telehealth Requirements Curtail Access in Rural States? | mHEALTHINTELLIGENCE

Living in a urban center, I never really thought about the bandwidth requirements for video telehealth, but mandates to bring it to places that are still on effectively dial-up or 3G speeds are short-sighted at best. Then again, my local providers of such services aren’t covered by Medicaid here in North Carolina (or if they are, that’s certainly not promoted!).

mHEALTHINTELLIGENCE photo

A new study finds that states that mandate video-based telemedicine may be curbing access to care for underserved populations that don;t have the broadband to use video.

Source: Do Video Telehealth Requirements Curtail Access in Rural States?

Visual Studio for Nintendo Switch? – FUZE4 Nintendo Switch is an amazing coding app | SCOTT HANSELMAN

This is quite an interesting concept from a person I follow and read about. Scroll down for my comment and question (if it’s been approved to stay).

Source: Visual Studio for Nintendo Switch? – FUZE4 Nintendo Switch is an amazing coding app

TechSpark El Paso-Juarez: Igniting digital transformation throughout the Borderplex | Microsoft on the Issues

TechSpark El Paso-Juarez: Igniting digital transformation throughout the Borderplex | Microsoft on the Issues
The El Paso-Ciudad Juárez Borderplex (Microsoft article photo)

On the 32nd parallel in a gap within the Franklin Mountain range sits an international intersection where two nations, cultures, languages and people meld together. Every day thousands of people legally cross back and forth between El Paso, Texas, and Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, on their way to jobs, schools, doctor’s appointments, shopping centers and the homes of family and friends. This harmonious exchange has taken place for more than 400 years, uniting neighbors through shared social ties, geography, history and, most importantly, an interlinked economy.

This active border crossing alone accounts for 12 percent of total U.S. trade with Mexico, close to $45 billion per year. Businesses in El Paso and Juárez exchange goods and services back and forth, creating products commonly made in the Mexican city with American components using advanced manufacturing technologies, which are typically then transported by enterprises in El Paso using advanced supply chain and logistics technologies.

Beyond the people and goods, El Paso and Ciudad Juárez also converge in a cross-border flow of ideas, ambition and aspirations that have shaped the region for centuries. This forward-looking spirit is what attracted us to the region in 2017, when we launched Microsoft TechSpark to create new economic opportunities and help digitally transform established industries with modern software and cloud services. It’s also why today we are announcing that we are expanding the TechSpark El Paso program to include Ciudad Juárez and are making a $1.5 million investment in the bi-national Bridge Accelerator.

TechSpark is a six-community initiative aimed at bringing a bit of the Silicon Valley to the middle of the country by promoting the infusion of transformational technologies into the local economy through investments in computer science education in high schools, digital skills training, high-speed broadband and technology for nonprofits. To manage this broad portfolio, we hired a TechSpark manager, JJ Childress, who lives and works in El Paso.

The Bridge Accelerator

One person who is contributing to the cross-border stream of innovation is Ricardo Mora, a self-described third-generation serial entrepreneur who has built successful businesses on both sides of the border. Mora runs the Technology-Hub (T-Hub) and has a vision for the region. It’s one that includes the digital transformation of businesses and digital skills for the people living here.

Microsoft is partnering with T-Hub on The Bridge Accelerator, which is an intensive initiative with custom programs for the manufacturing industry, entrepreneurs and established companies. It’s designed to accelerate the growth of businesses on both sides of the border by combining technology with business acumen while creating advantageous connections between entrepreneurs and corporations. The program includes an early-investment venture capital fund and a digital fabrication lab called the Fab Lab that helps fledgling start-ups create prototypes of their inventions.

TEALS: Computer Science in High Schools

The key to fueling this cross-border innovation is talent – people who know how to create and use new technology. This starts with students in the region, who need the opportunity to study computer science in high school if they are to succeed in the digital era. But only 45 percent of U.S. high schools teach computer science, according to the nonprofit Code.org. Microsoft’s Technology and Literacy in Schools (TEALS) program is helping schools across the nation and Canada build their own computer science programs through partnerships between teachers and volunteers from the technology sector.

To read this post in Spanish, click here.

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PyDev of the Week: Elana Hashman | The Mouse vs The Python

PyDev of the Week: Elana Hashman | The Mouse vs The Python

This week we welcome Elana Hashman (@ehashdn) as our PyDev of the Week! Elana is a director of the Open Source Initiative and a fellow of the Python Software Foundation. She is also the Clojure Packaging Team lead and a Java Packaging Team member. You can see some of her work over on Github. You can also learn more about Elana on her website. Let’s take a few moments to get to know her better!

Can you tell us a little about yourself (hobbies, education, etc):

I love to bake and cook, so my Twitter feed tends to be full of various bread pictures or whatever dish I’ve whipped up over the weekend. When I was a kid, I was completely hooked on the cooking channel—my favourite shows were “Iron Chef” and “Good Eats”—and I thought I’d become a chef when I grew up. That’s my back up plan if I ever drop out of tech!

I’m Canadian, and I attended the University of Waterloo in Ontario to study mathematics, majoring in Combinatorics & Optimization with a Computer Science minor. The University of Waterloo is famous for its co-operative study program, where students take an extra year to finish their degrees and forfeit their summers off to complete 5-6 paid co-op work terms. To give my schedule a bit more flexibility, I actually dropped out of the co-op program, but prior to graduating I completed 4 co-op terms, a Google Summer of Code internship, some consulting, and even became an open source maintainer. I learned how to admin servers for the Computer Science Club, and a group of my friends and I revived the Amateur Radio Club after it had been inactive for a decade.

Amateur (or “ham”) radio got me into playing with electronics, so I learned how to solder and now I occasionally build cool things like the PiDP-11 kit. And now that I can solder a PCB, I want to see if I can solder silver, so I’m signing up to take some jewellery-making classes this fall. I also take care of a bunch of wonderful, mostly low-maintenance houseplants. One day I hope to have a full-sized backyard for growing vegetables and setting up radio antennas!

Why did you start using Python?

I first learned Python to contribute to the OpenHatch project back in 2013. I had signed up for the Open Source Day at the Grace Hopper Celebration and was assigned to the WordPress group, but I ran into Asheesh Laroia and Carol Willing earlier at the conference and they poached me! I was amazed at how easy it was to read and understand the project code, even though I hadn’t written any Python before.

My very first bug assignment turned out to be more complex than anticipated, but I was later able to make a contribution and completed an entire summer internship with OpenHatch through Google Summer of Code, where I learned how to write Django and do Python web development. I then maintained the OpenHatch website and backend codebase for a little over a year, before the project started to wind down.

What other programming languages do you know and which is your favorite?

Oh, a lot! My first programming language was probably mIRCscript, which I learned as a teenager to make IRC bots and triggers, but I didn’t pick up any substantial programming skills until university. In school I studied Scheme, C, C++ and bash, and I learned SQL, Perl, and C# during my co-op jobs.

After I graduated, I worked primarily in Clojure, a dialect of Lisp that runs on the JVM. I might call that my favourite programming language because it’s so expressive and powerful, though I’m fond of all Lisps. Most folks would describe Python as a high-level language, but I can write much more terse, elegant abstractions in a Lisp than I can in Python! It’s the only language I’ve written where my colleagues have complimented my code by calling it “pretty” 😀

These days I don’t write much Clojure or Python; for my current day job, I work as a site reliability engineer for OpenShift on Azure, which means I write a lot of Golang and a little bash. I find Go a little bit too low-level for my tastes, but it’s really satisfying and cool to be able to contribute to upstream Kubernetes!

Thanks for doing the interview, Elana!

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Samsung and other Google partners show interest in Fuchsia – 9to5Google

Samsung and other Google partners show interest in Fuchsia – 9to5Google

Not frequent enough for my tastes, but it looks like Fuchsia is near the point of being the official successor of Android. And more importantly from Google’s point of view is direct control, unlike Android which is open source. Here’s hoping for more consistent news on that front.

This may be related to this announcement and article on ZDNet.

Over the past two years, we’ve closely followed the development of Google’s Fuchsia OS and the various hardware products it supports. Thus far, these products have almost all been Made by Google devices like the Pixelbook and Nest Hub, used simply as testbeds for Fuchsia on various form factors. But if Fuchsia is to ever succeed, Google will need to partner with other companies on developing their own Fuchsia-based hardware and software projects.

This week in Fuchsia Friday, we take a look at the various Google partners that have looked into Fuchsia OS, including familiar names like Samsung and Sony.

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