Google is beginning to ‘dogfood’ test Fuchsia OS | 9to5Google

Google is beginning to ‘dogfood’ test Fuchsia OS | 9to5Google

It looks like the OS is getting ready for its closeup. A good thing to get somewhat excited about.

In software, there’s a point where developers “eat their own dogfood,” before letting users try it. Google’s Fuchsia OS has reached this dogfood stage.

Bachelor Chow — now with flavor!
Beyond the normal public testing stages like Alpha and Beta, Google has quite a few internal testing stages, all stemming from the same “dogfood” name.

Tastes like dogfood
So what would a dogfood test of Fuchsia actually look like? From what we’ve learned over the years, Fuchsia is able to run on desktops, laptops, tablets, Chromebooks, phones, routers, smart displays, and more. That means a dogfood test could be for any or all of these different purposes for Fuchsia…

The rest of the post is found at this source: Google is beginning to ‘dogfood’ test Fuchsia OS – 9to5Google

Fuchsia – Fuchsia Programming Language Policy

Fuchsia – Fuchsia Programming Language Policy

Finally, some added guidance of the Fuschia project that may ultimately replace Android as Google’s mobile platform.

This document describes which programming languages the Fuchsia project uses and supports for production software on the target device, both within the Fuchsia Platform Source Tree and for end-developers building for Fuchsia outside the Fuchsia Source Platform Tree. The policy does not apply to (a) developer tooling, either on target or host devices, or (b) software on the target device that is not executed in normal, end-user operation of the device. For example, this policy does not apply to zxdb (a debugger) because zxdb is a developer tool; the policy does apply to pkgfs because pkgfs (a file system) executes in the normal, end-user operation of the device.

Fuchsia Programming Language Policy

Source: Fuchsia – Fuchsia Programming Language Policy

PyDev of the Week: Hameer Abbasi | The Mouse vs The Python

PyDev of the Week: Hameer Abbasi | The Mouse vs The Python

This week we welcome Hameer Abbasi as our PyDev of the Week! Hameer works on the PyData Sparse project. You can check out what else Hameer is working on over on Github. Let’s take some time to get to know him better!

Can you tell us a little about yourself (hobbies, education, etc):

My hobby is, and has been for a while, scientific computing in general, the ecosystem and how to make it better. I’m lucky and grateful to have found a job in that same field, even though my formal education wasn’t in either Mathematics or Computer Science. Moving over to my education, I completed my Bachelors in Electrical (Telecommunications) Engineering from National University of Sciences and Technology, Pakistan in July 2014. After being a professional for a year at LMK Resources, Pakistan until September, 2015, I moved to Germany and completed my Masters in Information and Communication Engineering from Technische Universität Darmstadt (English: Technical University of Darmstadt) in October, 2015. I started with Quansight as a contractor then, and I’m continuing that to date.

Why did you start using Python?

I was doing a Hilfswissenschaftler job (sort of like a Research Assistant in the USA), and there I was presented the problem of scaling a sparse system to a larger space. I discovered the PyData/Sparse project back then (it was in Matthew Rocklin’s personal repository at the time), and was immediately fascinated by the idea of computational gains to be had if one moved to a sparse representation. I’m now the maintainer for that project, and I’m grateful I chose that path, as it landed me a talk at SciPy 2018 and a client in the form of Quansight.

What other programming languages do you know and which is your favorite?

I’ve dabbled in a lot of programming languages over the years. Started with Visual Basic 2000, moved on to Visual Basic .NET, HTML, Java, Javascript, C++. The ones I really feel I know, though are Python and C#, because I have hands on experience on real projects with these. I like Rust’s “do it right the first time” model.

My favourite of all these to work with is probably C#, because of the excellent tooling around it, but as a language I like Python more.

Thanks for doing the interview, Hameer!

The rest of the post PyDev of the Week: Hameer Abbasi appeared first on The Mouse Vs. The Python.

from The Mouse Vs. The Python https://ift.tt/32jwRFI

eSports needs to join the rest of society and be open to everyone | NowThis

eSports needs to join the rest of society and be open to everyone | NowThis

Another Step in Testing ElectionGuard | Microsoft on the Issues

Another Step in Testing ElectionGuard | Microsoft on the Issues

After the debacle in the Iowa Caucuses early this month (though not directly related due to other circumstances) trust in the voting and election process continues to be under attack both internally and externally. The goal is to get it right, and Microsoft is doing it’s part to make it work for everyone.

Microsoft On the Issues Photo Credit

Feb 17, 2020   |   Tom Burt – Corporate Vice President, Customer Security & Trust

Tomorrow I’ll be in Fulton, Wisconsin, with a team of people from Microsoft taking one of many steps needed to prepare our ElectionGuard technology for broad adoption. Together with election officials from the state of Wisconsin and the election technology company VotingWorks, we will be piloting ElectionGuard in an actual election for the first time.

As voters in Fulton go to their polling place tomorrow to cast ballots in a primary election for Wisconsin Supreme Court candidates, the official count will be tallied using paper ballots as usual. However, ElectionGuard will also provide an encrypted digital tally of the vote that will enable voters to confirm their votes have been counted and not altered. Tomorrow’s pilot is one step in a deliberate and careful process to get ElectionGuard right before it’s used more broadly across the country.

Preparing technology for wide adoption is accomplished through incremental steps that enable iteration and improvement. We first demonstrated an implementation of ElectionGuard to cybersecurity experts and others at the annual Aspen Security Forum last summer. Then, in September, we shared the code for ElectionGuard as an open source project on GitHub so voting machine manufacturers, security researchers and others could begin testing it. We announced a bug bounty program, offering up to $15,000 to people who report security vulnerabilities with ElectionGuard so they can be fixed. The code was also tested for security vulnerabilities by NCC Group. Tomorrow’s pilot gives us the first chance to see ElectionGuard in action in a real election, to assess its performance and observe voter reaction. We hope to learn from this so we can continue to work with election officials in Wisconsin and other states – and with technology partners such as VotingWorks – to improve ElectionGuard. This is by no means the last step in our preparation; we anticipate many more pilots of ElectionGuard technology as we get it ready for prime time.

To be clear, the biggest credit for tomorrow’s pilot goes to the Wisconsin Election Commission and its Administrator Meagan Wolfe, as well as Rock County Clerk Lisa Tollefson for making the decision to try ElectionGuard so they can evaluate it for future use, and to VotingWorks, which designed and built much of the physical voting experience used in Fulton tomorrow. We’ve worked closely with the Commission and VotingWorks in recent months to test the system and voting machines for pilot use tomorrow, to conduct a public test of the machines even before the pilot, and to train polling place workers. We are also grateful to Connie Zimmerman, the Fulton Town Clerk, for enabling and supporting this pilot in the polling place she’s run for years, and to the Fulton Town Board, which voted to approve the pilot…

The rest of the post Another Step in Testing ElectionGuard appeared first on Microsoft on the Issues.

from Microsoft on the Issues https://ift.tt/32amGn2
via IFTTT

Cloudticity Brings HIPAA Compliance to Amazon Cloud-Native Workloads | The New Stack

Cloudticity Brings HIPAA Compliance to Amazon Cloud-Native Workloads | The New Stack

The move to the cloud is one that started more than a decade ago for some companies and has yet to happen for some others. The reasons for the lag are varied, but for some governmental regulations, such as the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), which regulates data privacy concerns for companies in the healthcare sector, are also to blame for the delay. With requirements around data retention and encryption, it can be easier to stay with what you know rather than make the move to the latest technology…

Source: Cloudticity Brings HIPAA Compliance to Amazon Cloud-Native Workloads

PyDev of the Week: Martin Fitzpatrick | The Mouse vs The Python

PyDev of the Week: Martin Fitzpatrick | The Mouse vs The Python

This week we welcome Martin Fitzpatrick (@mfitzp) as our PyDev of the Week! Martin is the author of “Create Simple GUI Applications with Python and Qt 5” and the creator of the LearnPyQt website. You can also check out his personal site or see what he’s up to by visiting his Github profile. Let’s spend some time getting to know Martin better!

Martin Fitzpatrick

Can you tell us a little about yourself (hobbies, education, etc):

I’m a developer from the United Kingdom, who’s been working with Python for the past 12 years, and living in the Netherlands (Amersfoort) for the past 5.

I started coding on 8 bit machines back in the early 90s, creating platform games of dubious quality â€” in my defence we didn’t have StackOverflow back then. Later I moved onto the PC, first writing DOS games and then, after someone invented the internet, doing a stint of web dev. I’ve been programming on and off ever since.

Rather than pursue software development as a career, I instead took a long detour into healthcare/biology. I worked first in the ambulance service, then as a physiotherapy assistant and finally completed a degree and PhD in Bioinformatics & Immunology. This last step was where I discovered Python, ultimately leading me to where I am now.

In my spare time I tinker in my workshop, creating daft electronic games and robots.

I like robots.

Why did you start using Python?

I first used Python back in 2007 when I was looking for at alternatives to building websites with Drupal/PHP. That led me to Django and Python. It felt so much simpler and more logical than what I’d used before, after knocking something together in an afternoon I was basically hooked.

For the next few years I was using Python almost exclusively for web development, and it probably would have stayed that way was it not for my PhD.

My thesis project was looking at the effects of metabolism on rheumatoid arthritis, and required me to analyse some big chunks of data. Having worked with Python for the previous 4 years it only seemed natural to try and use it here, rather than stop and learn R or MATLAB. The Python data analysis landscape was still a bit rough back then, but improving quickly — pandas and Jupyter notebooks first appeared during this time. The final couple of years of my PhD I was looking to make the tools I’d written more accessible to non-technical users and started building GUI applications with PyQt5.

In the past couple of years I discovered microcontrollers (ESP8266 and Raspberry Pi) and have built some silly things with MicroPython.

What other programming languages do you know and which is your favorite?

Python is my favourite, hands down. There is something about the language that lines up very well with my brain, might be all the empty space.

I have learnt and forgotten quite a few languages including PHP, Pascal, Perl, Prolog and Z80 assembler. I can still bash something together in C and does MicroPython count as another language?

Thanks for doing the interview, Martin

The rest of the post PyDev of the Week: Martin Fitzpatrick appeared first on The Mouse Vs. The Python.

from The Mouse Vs. The Python https://ift.tt/38yAJ8l

How Cloud Computing Can Help Solve Coronavirus | The New Stack

How Cloud Computing Can Help Solve Coronavirus | The New Stack
A The New Stack image
With Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCov) causing more deaths than the 2003 SARS outbreak and showing no signs of containment, one thing becomes clear: the disease is out of our control right now and we’re going to have to get innovative if we want to catch up with it.

The disease originated in China back in December, and while there’s been a lot of controversy around how it was handled, it’s important to recognize that our energy is best spent finding solutions.

Now, more than ever, the world needs to come together. We have to bring forth the best minds in healthcare and technology and innovate if we’re going to outsmart this disease.

Here is where the 3 main Cloud providers can get together to help solve this issue that affects everyone.

How Cloud Computing Can Help Solve Coronavirus – The New Stack:

https://ift.tt/2Hff0WZ via Tumblr and IFTTT

Digital civility at lowest level in 4 years, new Microsoft research shows | Microsoft on the Issues

Digital civility at lowest level in 4 years, new Microsoft research shows | Microsoft on the Issues

The Microsoft Digital Civility Index (DCI), a measure of the tone and tenor of online interactions as reported by consumers in 25 countries, stands at its lowest level since the survey began. Findings are being released in conjunction with international Safer Internet Day, February 11.

Microsoft’s Digital Civility Index stands at 70%, the highest reading of perceived online incivility since the survey began in 2016, and the first time the DCI has reached the 70th percentile. Moreover, the equally troubling trends of emotional and psychological pain ­– and negative consequences that follow online-risk exposure – both also increased significantly. Results are from “Civility, Safety and Interactions Online – 2019,” which gauged teens’ and adults’ perceptions about online life and their exposure to 21[1] online risks across four categories: reputational, behavioral, sexual and personal/intrusive. The index works like a golf score: The lower the index reading (on a scale from zero to 100), the lower respondents’ risk exposure and the higher the perceived level of online civility among people in that country.

The rest of the post Digital civility at lowest level in 4 years, new Microsoft research shows appeared first on Microsoft on the Issues.

from Microsoft on the Issues https://ift.tt/2UNCgTE
via IFTTT

PyDev of the Week: Paul Sokolovsky | The Mouse vs The Python

PyDev of the Week: Paul Sokolovsky | The Mouse vs The Python

This week we welcome Paul Sokolovsky as our PyDev of the Week! Paul is the creator of Pycopy, which is described as “a minimalist and memory-efficient Python implementation for constrained systems, microcontrollers, and just everything”. You can check out more of his contributions to open source on Github. Let’s take a few moments to get to know Paul better!

Paul Sokolovsky

Can you tell us a little about yourself (hobbies, education, etc):

I have Computer Science as my first masters, and later got another masters in Linguistics – when I was a CS student I was interested in Natural Language Processing subfield of AI, and wanted to get a formal degree to work in that areas, perhaps in academia, but that never panned out, I got sucked up into the IT industry, a common story ;-).

Hobbies – well, nothing special, I like to travel, and even if a plane carries me far away, I like to get on my feet and explore like humans did it for millennia. Though if there’s a motorbike for rent, I like to ride it to a more distant mountain before climbing it. My latest interest is history. Like, everyone took history lessons in school and might have their “favorite” history of a particular country at particular timeframe, but trying to grasp history of mankind across the mentioned millennia is a different matter.

Why did you start using Python?

Oh, as many students, at that age I drooled over Lisp and Scheme programming languages. I did a few projects in them, and while they were definitely great and I could grok them, it occurred to me that I wasn’t not sure about the rest of world. Programming is inherently social activity. And besides the power of those languages, their drawbacks were also evident, and while I was able to surmount them, other people might be not just unable, but even unwilling to do that.

So, I started my quest of the best-in-compromise programming languages, sifting thru dozens of both mainstream and obscure languages of that time. I stopped when I found Python. I think of it as “Lisp for real world”. Those were the times of Python 1.5.1…

What other programming languages do you know and which is your favorite?

Based on the above, it shouldn’t come as surprise that Python is my favorite languages. I know a bunch of scripting languages – Perl, PHP, Java, JavaScript, Lisp, Scheme, and more “systemish” ones like C and C++. I definitely watch the space and keep an eye on Go, Rust which approaching upstream and niche contenders like Nim, Zig, whatever. I don’t rush into using them – again, I passed that stage of language-hopping when I was a student.

Thanks for doing the interview, Paul!

The rest of the post PyDev of the Week: Paul Sokolovsky appeared first on The Mouse Vs. The Python.

from The Mouse Vs. The Python https://ift.tt/2SdPLe0

Dan Price does the right thing. NowThis News.

Dan Price does the right thing. NowThis News.

UPDATE: The Subject of this above twitter post, Dan Price, has laid some more wisdom nuggets on the dinner table of 💯.

PyDev of the Week: Alessia Marcolini | The Mouse vs The Python

PyDev of the Week: Alessia Marcolini | The Mouse vs The Python
This week we welcome Alessia Marcolini (@viperale) as our PyDev of the Week! Alessia is a Python blogger and speaker. You can check out some of her work over on Medium. You can also see some of her coding skills on Github. Let’s spend a few moments getting to know her better!

Alessia Marcolini

Can you tell us a little about yourself (hobbies, education, etc):

Hello everybody, my name is Alessia and I’m 21. I come from a little town near Verona, a beautiful city in the north of Italy.

I’ve been living in Trento (Italy) for 2 years and a half now. I moved here to attend university: I’m currently enrolled in the third year of a Bachelor’s degree in Computer Science.

In 2017 I started working part time as a Junior Research Assistant in the Bruno Kessler Foundation, too. FBK is a research foundation based in Trento, working on Science, Technology, and Social Sciences. I’m part of the MPBA unit which focuses on novel applications of Deep Learning from complex data: e.g. Precision Medicine, Imaging and Portable Spectroscopy in industry processes, Nowcasting on time-spatial data. I’m currently working on deep learning frameworks to integrate multiple medical imaging modalities and different clinical data to get more precise prognostic/diagnostic functions.

When not coding, I love dancing and listening to music. I have also been part of a hip hop crew until 2017.

Why did you start using Python?

Well, this dates back to the very first years of my technical high school. We had a teacher who, going against the opinions of many other computer science teachers in my school, decided to teach students in my class Python as the first ever programming language. So, it wasn’t really a choice I made. However, after these six years, I realise how lucky I was to have had that teacher (joking, I realised it even before, I still love that teacher and we are on the best terms but perhaps I did not understand the impact he would have on my future).

What other programming languages do you know and which is your favorite?

It’s difficult to say whether you “know” or you “don’t know” a programming language. I can say that Python is my most practiced language, since I’ve been using it every day at work for three years now. Apart from it, I had the opportunity to practice also Java, C and C++ at school and at university. I also took part in the Italian Olympiad in Informatics in teams for a couple of years and we were required to write our programs in C++.

Anyway, Python is definitely my favourite programming language: it is easy to learn, the syntax is intuitive and with Python you can accomplish tasks with much less code than with other languages. It’s very handy for writing scripts, but at the same time it’s powerful and it gives you the possibility to write an entire object oriented application end-to-end. It can serve multiple areas of application, from web development, to desktop development, to data science.

They say you “Come for the language, Stay for the community”, and this is really one of the aspects I appreciate the most about the Python environment. My experience with the Python community has been awesome and that’s why I always encourage people to come to the Python world (more on this later).

Thanks for doing the interview, Alessia!

The rest of the post PyDev of the Week: Alessia Marcolini appeared first on The Mouse Vs. The Python.

from The Mouse Vs. The Python https://ift.tt/2Se4K69