Microsoft to join White House-led consortium to fight COVID-19 | Microsoft On The Issues

Microsoft to join White House-led consortium to fight COVID-19 | Microsoft On The Issues

Today, the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy announced the launch of the COVID-19 High Performance Computing Consortium to provide COVID-19 researchers worldwide with access to the world’s most powerful High Performance Computing (HPC) resources that can significantly advance the pace of scientific discovery in the fight to stop the virus.

This unique public-private consortium, spearheaded by the White House, the U.S. Department of Energy and IBM, includes Microsoft and other industry, government and academic leaders who have volunteered free compute time and resources.

Microsoft, as part of the AI for Health program, will provide grants to ensure additional access for researchers to our Azure cloud and high-performance computing capabilities. Our team of AI for Health data science experts, whose mission is to improve the health of people and communities worldwide, is also open to collaborations with COVID-19 researchers as they tackle this critical challenge.

Read the full statement here: https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefings-statements/white-house-announces-new-partnership-unleash-u-s-supercomputing-resources-fight-covid-19/

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PyDev of the Week: Takeshi Komiya | The Mouse vs The Python

PyDev of the Week: Takeshi Komiya | The Mouse vs The Python

This week we welcome Komiya Takeshi as our PyDev of the Week! Takeshi is a maintainer of Sphinx, Python’s documentation package. Takeshi is also the creator of blockdiag, diagram image generator. If you are interested in seeing some of the other projects that Komiya contributes to, you should check out his Github profile.

Let’s spend some time getting to know Takeshi better!

Can you tell us a little about yourself (hobbies, education, etc):

I am a software engineer from Tokyo, Japan. Now I work at Time Intermedia Corp. as CTO. Time Intermedia is a systems integrator.

I love to have tea when I’m programming. I often bring my laptop to a cafe and enjoy programming all day long. My hobbies include driving all around Japan and watching football games.

Why did you start using Python?

My first contact with Python was 10+ years ago, when I took part in a local Hackathon event as a staff; Zope/Plone Hack-a-thon (now renamed to Python mini Hack-a-thon). In those days, I used to mostly use Ruby for my hobby projects. I started using Python for my OSS projects since then.

My first product of Python is blockdiag. It is a converter from a text written in original syntax to block diagram image. I think it let me know to enjoy programming in OSS. Even now, I sometimes see the tweets and articles about blockdiag. I’m very happy to see them.

What other programming languages do you know and which is your favorite?

So far, I have experience in C, Perl, PHP, Ruby, and Python. If I have to choose one, I prefer to use Python. Since I started using Python, I have used it for OSS works almost every night. So I’m familiar with it.

I also love Ruby. It lets me know programming is a fan. Now I have no time to write code in Ruby. But I still like it.

Thanks for doing the interview, Takeshi!

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This could be the tipping point for teleworking as it is forced upon us…

This could be the tipping point for teleworking as it is forced upon us…

Delivering online meetings and events | Microsoft Office

At a moment when organizations across the world are adjusting to remote work, we’re all learning new ways to keep our employees, customers, and business partners connected and informed. Without being able to get together in person, we need new approaches to everything from customer meetings and employee training calls to large events like CEO town halls and global sales conferences.

Many of our customers have asked us: How can we make these gatherings as effective online as in person? Microsoft Teams Meetings, Microsoft 365 live events, LinkedIn Live, and—coming soon—PowerPoint Live are all designed to help you create engaging, effective virtual gatherings. And we want to help you make the most of them. Here I’ll walk you through each of these tools and capabilities, and let you know which type of meetings they’re best suited to. Let’s get started.

Source: Delivering online meetings and events

Notification of Enforcement Discretion for telehealth remote communications during the COVID-19 nationwide public health emergency

Notification of Enforcement Discretion for telehealth remote communications during the COVID-19 nationwide public health emergency

This is a major announcement and one that I did not see coming from this administration. This should be done years ago, especially with most of the major players in this space HIPAA compliant already.

IMHO

We are empowering medical providers to serve patients wherever they are during this national public health emergency. We are especially concerned about reaching those most at risk, including older persons and persons with disabilities. – Roger Severino, OCR Director.

The Office for Civil Rights (OCR) at the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is responsible for enforcing certain regulations issued under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA), as amended by the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act, to protect the privacy and security of protected health information, namely the HIPAA Privacy, Security and Breach Notification Rules (the HIPAA Rules).

During the COVID-19 national emergency, which also constitutes a nationwide public health emergency, covered health care providers subject to the HIPAA Rules may seek to communicate with patients, and provide telehealth services, through remote communications technologies. Some of these technologies, and the manner in which they are used by HIPAA covered health care providers, may not fully comply with the requirements of the HIPAA Rules.

OCR will exercise its enforcement discretion and will not impose penalties for noncompliance with the regulatory requirements under the HIPAA Rules against covered health care providers in connection with the good faith provision of telehealth during the COVID-19 nationwide public health emergency. This notification is effective immediately…

The rest of the post is Sourced: Notification of Enforcement Discretion for telehealth

Developer Advocates Revise Their Approach in This Time of Social Distancing

Developer Advocates Revise Their Approach in This Time of Social Distancing
TheNewStack image.

Developer advocates act as technical community gardeners. But how do you tend to a garden you can’t go near?

Developer relation folks, those who attend conferences to preach the gospel and help users get more from their tools, most certainly are in that 15% of people who do 70% of the flying. The worldwide COVID-19 pandemic sees them grounded for the foreseeable future, deterred even from local meetups. Now they must rethink how they carry out their duties without travel.

“The DevRel move is to go to a conference, go to a meetup — the DevRel move is travel. That door got slammed shut,” said Patrick McFadin, vice president of developer relations at DataStax.

The silver lining in this ensuing period of mandatory work-from-home is that it will create an opportunity not only for developer advocates but for the whole conference-centric tech industry to push the reset button — not only to embrace inclusion and accessibility and to decrease carbon footprint. And to evade DevRel travel burnout…

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PyDev of the Week: Jessica Garson | The Mouse vs The Python

PyDev of the Week: Jessica Garson | The Mouse vs The Python

This week we welcome Jessica Garson (@jessicagarson) as our PyDev of the Week! Jessica is a developer advocate at Twitter. She also teaches Python at New York University. You can see some of what she’s up to over on Github. Let’s spend some time getting to know her better!

Can you tell us a little about yourself (hobbies, education, etc):

I’m currently a Developer Advocate at Twitter, where I work to make sure developers have good experiences using the Twitter API. What that means is that I write example code, speak at conferences and create blog posts. I also make noise music with Python and perform regularly in the New York area under the artist name, Messica Arson. Before working in technology, I worked on political campaigns.

Why did you start using Python?

I started learning how to code on my own in 2010, which proved to be very difficult. I was working at a political data consulting company, and all of the backend code was written in Perl so I started reading a book on Perl. A coworker saw my book and pulled me aside and mentioned that if he were learning how to code today, he’d learn Python. Shortly thereafter, I found a community group in Washington, DC called Hear me Code which was free beginner-friendly classes for women by women.

What other programming languages do you know and which is your favorite?

I’ve been growing my skills in JavaScript lately. I’m excited to learn more about TensorFlow.js. In the past year, I’ve grown my skills in R quite a bit as well. I also make music sometimes using Ruby and Haskell…

Thanks for doing the interview, Jessica!

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