Ideas from the heart could help make employment more attainable for people with disabilities

Braille devices being demonstrated
Microsoft Photo
Microsoft Photo

Kim Charlson was 11 when she started losing her eyesight because of glaucoma. An operation a year and a half later not only didn’t help, it resulted in complications that hastened her blindness.

Her pragmatic parents insisted she learn Braille, a key to literacy for people who are blind or have low vision. Without that literacy, Charlson likely wouldn’t have gone on to college or a career. Only 13 percent of blind students in the United States know Braille, and roughly 70 percent of adults who are blind or have low vision are unemployed.

Those troubling statistics are one reason Charlson is excited about an app that will help increase the amount of time students can spend learning and practicing Braille. ObjectiveEd, the company that’s developing the Braille AI Tutor app, is a new recipient of Microsoft’s AI for Accessibility grants to people using AI-powered technology to make the world a more inclusive place. Ten other recipients joining the program in conjunction with National Disability Awareness Month include City University of London, inABLE, iMerciv and The Open University…

The rest of this post is found -> https://news.microsoft.com/features/ideas-from-the-heart-could-help-make-employment-more-attainable-for-people-with-disabilities/

Microsoft AI for education in the EU 🇪🇺 for everybody

I have been known to have a US centric Carolinas point of view. That would be improper to not recognize what’s happening halfway around the world.

How fathering a son with disabilities helped Microsoft’s CEO transform the company

Satya Nadella

Satya Nadella, CEO of Microsoft H/T: Windows Central

Mr. Nadella gets it. Haters will continue to hate, but they are the minority and will not be judged by them or their entities.

How fathering a son with disabilities helped Microsoft’s CEO transform the company

Disability backlog tops 1 million; thousands die on wait list (H/T = @scottsantens & @AP_Politics)

NC Disability Department

I can vouch for this as my application process took about 3 years to finally get my benefits. I truly believe this is done on purpose because they know if it’s finally accepted, they would have to go back to the beginning to pay all of the back awards. Universal Basic Income solves this problem nicely.

WASHINGTON (AP) — More than 1 million Americans await a hearing to see whether they qualify for disability benefits from Social Security, with the average wait nearly two years — longer than some of them will live.

All have been denied benefits at least once, as most applications are initially rejected. But in a system where the outcome of a case often depends on who decides it, most people who complete the appeals process will eventually win benefits. The numbers come from data compiled by the Social Security Administration.

About 10.5 million people get disability benefits from Social Security. An additional 8 million get disability benefits from Supplemental Security Income, the disability program for poor people who don’t qualify for Social Security. The disability programs are much smaller than Social Security’s giant retirement program. Still, the agency paid out $197 billion in disability payments last year.

Recipients won’t get rich as the average benefit is $1,037 a month — too small to lift a family of two out of poverty.

Source: Disability backlog tops 1 million; thousands die on wait list (H/T = @scottsantens & @AP_Politics)

Some say people on disability just need to get back to work. It’s not that easy.

Some say people on disability just need to get back to work. It’s not that easy.

The Washington Post does an excellent job covering this topic. This blog has alluded to one of their stories specifically on this matter. DISCLAIMER: I am a paying subscriber to the Washington Post national digital edition.

One of the overriding themes of this blog is an advocacy for a Universal Basic Income that is coupled with Universal Health Care. It shouldn’t take a natural disaster such as Hurricane/Tropical Storm Harvey to realize that everyone deserves a place and feeling that they are not abandoned or uncared for, not to mention unloved.

Lisa Daunhauer wanted to be one of the few to get off benefits. But first, she had to succeed at Walmart.

Source: Some say people on disability just need to get back to work. It’s not that easy.

Disabled, or just desperate? Rural Americans turn to disability as jobs dry up

Disabled, or just desperate? Rural Americans turn to disability as jobs dry up

disability2_0001_Redacted
It is stories such as this is why I submitted my plan for a Universal Basic Income with some responses, some of which I did not even consider. The first image to the left is shortly after I applied for disability, that had the required physical exam.

The imPages from DisabiltyDecision10012014_Redactedage on the right is some 2 1/2 years later on approval on the 3rd attempt. What I have been told on the subject is that this is not unusual, at least for not getting it on the 1st try. Albeit a law firm that has a vested interest in handling these types of claims, this is a thing and has some explanation to why this is so (Binder and Binder, 2011). Part of what the article refers to may have played a part in this.

 

In rural Alabama, a man faced a difficult choice: Keep looking for work, or apply for disability?

Source: Disabled, or just desperate? Rural Americans turn to disability as jobs dry up | The Washington Post


Binder and Binder. (2011, July 14). Long Approval Process For Social Security Disability Claims. Retrieved April 12, 2017, from http://www.binderandbinder.com/In-The-News/Why-Do-Social-Security-Disability-Claims-Take-So-Long-to-be-Approved.shtml