PyDev of the Week: Qumisha Goss | The Mouse Vs. The Python

 

 

It is great to see Women Of Color using technology that empowers others. A reminder of the Zen of Python:

  • Beautiful is better than ugly
  • Explicit is better than implicit
  • Simple is better than complex
  • Complex is better than complicated
  • Readability counts

Source: PyDev of the Week: Qumisha Goss | The Mouse Vs. The Python

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8 Powerful Voices in Defense of Public Education – Diane Ravitch – Network For Public Education

Take 3 minutes to watch NPE President Diane Ravitch talk about how we can stop the steamroller that’s destroying our public schools – privatization.

Source: 8 Powerful Voices in Defense of Public Education – Diane Ravitch – Network For Public Education

DISCLAIMER: I’m subscribed to her education blog and think the world of her! 

Hidden Figures Has Inspired a State Department Education Exchange Program 

After Hidden Figures was released last year, an unprecedented amount of US embassies were reportedly calling the State Department requesting the film. Eventually, the movie was screened to nearly 80 locations overseas and because of all those screenings, a new, publicly funded exchange program will bring women from around the world working in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) to the United States.

Source: Hidden Figures Has Inspired a State Department Education Exchange Program 

Kansas: Schools, Funding, Taxes, and Lies from the Koch Brothers’ Spokesman

Why does the MSM let these folks get away with this? It’s beyond time to bring real subject experts on these programs.

Diane Ravitch's blog

While driving yesterday, I listened to a panel discussion on taxes led by correspondent Stephanie Ruhle on MSNBC.

With the usual left-right line-up of guests, they debated whether the Trump tax plan would benefit the rich or everyone.

The man from the right was part of the Koch brothers’ Americans for Prosperity. He insisted that massive tax cuts would be very beneficial for middle-income and poor Americans. The man from the left (center, really) disagreed and insisted that the big winners were the rich.

Then the center-left man said that the governor of Kentucky tried massive tax cuts and it backfired. He quickly was corrected (or corrected himself) and said it was Kansas, not Kentucky.

That’s where Governor Sam Brownback cut taxes, predicting an economic boom–that never happened. Instead, the state is facing a budget hole of nearly $900 million, and even Republicans recognize they must raise taxes.

But Mr…

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The Absurdity of Applying Industrial Lingo to Schools

Finally, someone articulated what has been on my mind for years, and yes the symptoms can be found locally as well from CMS (Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools) in particular.

Diane Ravitch's blog

I recently read a post by Larry Cuban about the difficulty of “scaling up successful reforms,” and I was reminded how much I dislike the application of industrial terminology to schooling. Larry offers some examples of successful efforts to “scale up,” but I question the effort itself.

While it is possible for schools to adopt and adapt a program or a practice that has worked out for others, the very idea of reproducing cookie-cutter schools designed to get high test scores invalidates the professional wisdom of educators. You can stamp out cars and tools with the right equipment, but you can’t reproduce good schools via mechanical processes.

People who work in business, industry, finance, or the tech sector like to speak of “scaling up,” of “innovation,” of “best practices,” and of “replication,” which they know how to do.

They are frustrated that success in one school is not easily packaged…

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George Will: Trump Has a Dangerous Disability

Ms. Ravitch has forgotten more about education and current events than I will ever know. I make a point to listen to these scholars.

Diane Ravitch's blog

George Will is a conservative columnist with a deep reverence for history and tradition. He is probably the most serious and respected conservative intellectual in the nation. On Thursday, he wrote a column called “Trump Has a Serious Disability” that was widely read. It was trending on Twitter. “Trump does not know what it is to know something.”

He writes:

“It is urgent for Americans to think and speak clearly about President Trump’s inability to do either. This seems to be not a mere disinclination but a disability. It is not merely the result of intellectual sloth but of an untrained mind bereft of information and married to stratospheric self-confidence.

“In February, acknowledging Black History Month, Trump said that “Frederick Douglass is an example of somebody who’s done an amazing job and is getting recognized more and more, I notice.” Because Trump is syntactically challenged, it was possible and tempting…

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The EFF calls out Google for privacy issues in the EDU sector but the school districts need educated, too – Android Central

The EFF calls out Google for privacy issues in the EDU sector but the school districts need educated, too – Android Central

The author, who I make a point to read whenever he writes, is pointing fingers at Google for privacy issues (where have we heard this before?) in the education market, which they have Windows PC-like control of. Google’s business model and privacy needs can co-exist if done properly. Unlike Apple or Microsoft, Google’s approach is essentially

here is the hardware and software in our cloud, now go run with it.

There is nothing inherently wrong with that approach and could be tied to cost savings compared to traditional school vendors. Handholding and administration outside of internal staff must be made available, and Google does not have a history of having an inside sales support force or some of the assets in place, thus the rub.

Microsoft is rumored to have a direct answer to this market by introducing a version of Windows 10 that is locked down, modern RT if you will. This time it is for Universal Windows Programs only. The selling point is that you can get a locked down device, but should the end user or administrator desire and pay a fee, it can be upgraded to full Windows 10 Home or Pro edition. This way you can have the best of both productivity worlds and can be executed today, unlike other devices announced. This will put a dent into Google’s dominance of the 3-12 education market, and make inroads in undergraduate studies with the upgrade options. The upgrade fee for educational buyers needs to include Office 365, OneDrive, and Skype automatically for up to 4 years. Pricing somewhere along the lines of $100 home and $150 pro. Currently $120 for home, $200 for pro, and $80 for Office University. Should Microsoft hit a home run with this in 2017, you better believe that the Electronic Freedom Foundation will have them in the crosshairs.

via The EFF calls out Google for privacy issues in the EDU sector but the school districts need educated, too | Android Central