Why did the Fuchsia OS team build a ‘release candidate’? – 9to5Google

Courtesy of Kyle Bradshaw, 9to5Google.com

Could it be that Google has a different way of presenting Alpha code as usable? This activity is analogous to what got Microsoft in trouble during their Computer World Domination period. I. E. use the public as unpaid Beta testers at best, and sometimes Alpha.

Fuschia continues to be an interesting product and will, I think, be Google’s answer to the One OS holy grail that all of the platform vendors want to get to, Microsoft being the closest or further along on that path.

Fuchsia, Google’s in-development OS for anything and everything, has marched on toward its latest milestone—the first “release candidate.”

Source: Why did the Fuchsia OS team build a ‘release candidate’? – 9to5Google

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Fuchsia Friday: The mystery of Dragonglass in Android, Chromium, and Fuchsia – 9to5Google

Granted, my ongoing interest is a mobile platform not tied to any legacy system, unlike Android (Java) or iOS (Objective-C); this proves how difficult to design a modern OS and make it all work. Sometimes it may be better not to re-invent the wheel here, but what do I know?

Earlier this week, we reported that just about everything we’ve seen about Fuchsia is now gone, as the “Armadillo” UI has been deleted. In its place, we only have references to what seems, in context, to be three other “shells” or user interfaces which are all kept closed-source by Google. However, one of these, “Dragonglass,” may offer more answers than we initially thought.

Source: Fuchsia Friday: The mystery of Dragonglass in Android, Chromium, and Fuchsia – 9to5Google

Fuchsia Friday: A first look at the Fuchsia SDK, which you can download…

Fuchsia Friday: A first look at the Fuchsia SDK, which you can download…

The edition for this week covers some technical, development aspects of Fuschia with an emphasis on the Dart language, one of 3 used by Google for the development purposes of their creation. What I find interesting here is that so far, no mention of the Go Language. It sounds like a subject for another episode as I find it hard to believe Go won’t play a huge part in Fuschia, which IMO is designed to be Android without ties to Java, therefore Oracle [successor to Sun Microsystems].

With the significant news this week that the Fuchsia SDK and a Fuchsia “device” are being added to the Android Open Source Project, now seems like a good time to learn more about the Fuchsia SDK.

 

The curious can find a download at the bottom of this article, but I obviously don’t recommend its usage for any major projects as it will swiftly become outdated and/or outright wrong. The tools in the included version are designed for use with 64-bit Linux, so if you’re on OS X, you’re on your own.

 

Not mentioned in the article means you are also on your own regarding Windows.

via Fuschia Friday SDK edition.

Fuchsia Friday: Fuchsia is gaining support for Java – by borrowing from Android – 9to5Google

H/T: Kyle Bradshaw

This is an interesting development to me because isn’t Kotlin is supposed to be the language that would be to Fuschia what Java is to Android? There is the backward compatibility thing that most projects must adhere to, especially in mainstream computing.

In an interesting turn of events this Friday evening, the beginnings of support for the Java programming language has arrived for Fuchsia. Where things get interesting is that this change was found in Android’s code, not Fuchsia’s.

We’ve long known that Android, Google’s 10 year old OS for phones and tablets, and Fuchsia, Google’s in-development OS for just about everything, would have a special relationship. This will be especially true if Google intends for Fuchsia to replace Android within 5 years.

Source: Fuchsia Friday: Fuchsia is gaining support for Java – by borrowing from Android – 9to5Google

Google might be working on a successor to Android – MSPoweruser

Photo credit: MSPowerUser

A bit behind Fuschia Fridays on 9to5Google, but any discussion of the next generation of mobile OSes is not a bad thing.

Google introduced the world to Android a decade ago and has seen an increase in usage since then. Despite having more than 85% of the Market Share, Android does have some problems.  It looks like Google is now working on a successor to Android to fix the issues Android has right now. Dubbed as “Fuchsia”, […]

Source: Google might be working on a successor to Android – MSPoweruser

Fuchsia Friday: The web and Fuchsia’s first ‘customers’

fuchsia-friday-web

H/T: Kyle Bradshaw

I even commented on this particular article, asking the question: Why not Python?

This week in Fuchsia Friday, we take a look at how Fuchsia will appeal to web developers and an interesting look at Fuchsia possibly being used outside Google.

 

We’ve long known that Google is trying to bring developers from as many different backgrounds as possible on-board with Fuchsia.

  • Go
  • Swift
  • Rust
  • Dart/Flutter
  • C & C++

are but some of the language influences behind the eventual replacement of Android.

via Fuchsia Friday: The web and Fuchsia’s first ‘customers’

Fuchsia Friday: FIDL is the Rosetta Stone of Fuchsia

fuchsia-friday-fidl

H/T: Kyle Bradshaw

With all the developer excitement following Google I/O this week, we’re keeping in theme with a developer-oriented Fuchsia Friday. The modern programmer usually has more than one programming language under their belt, with each one bringing its own unique strengths to the challenge at hand.

 

FIDL works in two parts, the Fuchsia Interface Definition Language itself, and an underlying system that connects the various languages together.

 

via Fuchsia Friday: FIDL is the Rosetta Stone of Fuchsia