How Microsoft is helping other companies hire people with autism | A Certified Warditorial

Just as Microsoft makes its technology available to other companies to help them achieve more, it is doing the same with its model for hiring people with autism.

 

April is Autism Awareness Month. Autism Spectrum Disorder affects one percent of the world’s population, about 3.5 million, or one out of 59 American births according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention and the Autism Society.

 

Autism Spectrum Disorder encompasses a range of conditions that present challenges with speech, social skills, non-verbal communication, and repetitive behaviors. On the flip side, many people with autism possess unique strengths in other areas that enable them to excel in certain disciplines.

 

Unfortunately, according to Easter Seals, 80% of people with autism are either unemployed or underemployed. Consequently, the skills and contributions that they would bring to many companies and to the products and services those companies offer are lost.

 

To address this untapped resource and to foster a culture of empathy and inclusion, Microsoft — on Autism Awareness Day in 2015 — established its Autism Hiring Program. This year, parallel to its commitment to open sourcing its technologies and tools to create a “Microsoft platform” that companies integrate into their businesses, the company is “democratizing” its Autism Hiring program. The goal is to bring more people with autism to the workforce so that they and the companies they join can achieve more.

 

from Windows Central – News, Forums, Reviews, Help for Windows 10 and all things Microsoft. http://bit.ly/2GcLIHs via IFTTT

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Finally, the wider employment market understands the real for the AARP generation.

Finally, the wider employment market understands how much the AARP generation has toiled in silence. 💯

John’s Crazy Socks spreads joy, shows power of hiring people with disabilities | Transform from Microsoft

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John and Mark Cronin, of John’s Crazy Socks H/T: Microsoft Transform blog.

This inspiring story slipped past my attention over the past week or so, but I am so glad I found it. Everyone has a talent; So thankful for the opportunity to highlight those who has nearly always been forgotten, but in today’s environment, might as well not even exist.

Then Cronin, who is 22 and has Down syndrome, reflected on his sartorial flair for colorful outfits and socks, a passion that began in fourth grade to the occasional shriek of his older brother: “Dad, you can’t let him go out like that!”

 

But Cronin’s fashion resolve led to his lightbulb idea for John’s Crazy Socks, a flourishing online store launched in late 2016. Based in Huntington, New York, the company has grown into a multi-million-dollar business with an inventory of more than 2,000 unique, cheerful and vibrant socks. They include socks with googly-eyed pineapples, smiling corgis, Van Gogh’s “Starry Night” and trolls with hair you can comb.

 

“They’re fun, colorful, creative and let me be me,” Cronin says of his affinity for joyous footwear.

John’s Crazy Socks spreads joy, shows power of hiring people with disabilities | Transform

via Tumblr https://ift.tt/2D8W4sZ published on October 29, 2018 at 08:11PM

The top 10 cities where you can find a blockchain job

Image: iStockphoto/metamorworks

Blockchain companies, startups, and investors are flocking to select cities across the US. Here’s where you can find a job.\..

You mean Charlotte didn’t make the list? I guess bankers aren’t fans of something that could render them mute.

Source: The top 10 cities where you can find a blockchain job

Oct. 19 Inclusive Hiring Virtual Career Fair is opportunity for job candidates with disabilities – The Fire Hose

MJGannon_MSFT

MJ Gardner, Software Engineer Azure (Microsoft)

One of my favorite tech companies is at it again. 👍

Oct. 19 Inclusive Hiring Virtual Career Fair is opportunity for job candidates with disabilities – The Fire Hose

Disabled, or just desperate? Rural Americans turn to disability as jobs dry up

Disabled, or just desperate? Rural Americans turn to disability as jobs dry up

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It is stories such as this is why I submitted my plan for a Universal Basic Income with some responses, some of which I did not even consider. The first image to the left is shortly after I applied for disability, that had the required physical exam.

The imPages from DisabiltyDecision10012014_Redactedage on the right is some 2 1/2 years later on approval on the 3rd attempt. What I have been told on the subject is that this is not unusual, at least for not getting it on the 1st try. Albeit a law firm that has a vested interest in handling these types of claims, this is a thing and has some explanation to why this is so (Binder and Binder, 2011). Part of what the article refers to may have played a part in this.

 

In rural Alabama, a man faced a difficult choice: Keep looking for work, or apply for disability?

Source: Disabled, or just desperate? Rural Americans turn to disability as jobs dry up | The Washington Post


Binder and Binder. (2011, July 14). Long Approval Process For Social Security Disability Claims. Retrieved April 12, 2017, from http://www.binderandbinder.com/In-The-News/Why-Do-Social-Security-Disability-Claims-Take-So-Long-to-be-Approved.shtml