Samsung’s Galaxy Fold woes validate Microsoft’s Surface Andromeda caution a Certified Warditorial

The 2019 technology marketplace for platform vendors has evolved, and Microsoft has made headway with it. In the Nadella era, the phrase, “don’t buy anything MS until the 3rd try” is mostly a thing of the past. Could it be that Microsoft’s mobile strategy is counterpunch when others fall, such as Samsung? This is the most recent black eye for the company (remember the Galaxy Note 7?). Not that I could even think of affording one, but for $2000, it better work perfectly. That’s 2 Surface Pros plus a decent phone.

Samsung’s Galaxy Fold was hit by early display issues and is now delayed — was Microsoft wise in not playing its foldable pocket PC Surface Andromeda card so soon?

 

Microsoft’s rumored Surface Andromeda pocket foldable PC is the dream device of many a Windows phone enthusiast. But the nightmare Samsung is enduring thanks to the early failures of its $2000 Galaxy Fold proves that some dreams are better deferred.

 

I have been writing about Microsoft’s inking focused pocket PC dreams since 2015. Skeptics, wary of Microsoft’s commitment to mobile initially dismissed this analysis. Over the years various leaks, Microsoft patents, the canceled Microsoft Courier and a leaked internal Microsoft email last year have confirmed not only Microsoft’s interest in pocketable folding mobile technology but its work toward bringing such an innovative device to market that “blurs the lines between mobile and PC.”

 


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First HoloLens application gets FDA approval for pre-operative planning | MSPoweruser

First HoloLens application gets FDA approval for pre-operative planning | MSPoweruser

Image: Novarad

The OpenSight Augmented Reality System is the first AR medical solution for Microsoft HoloLens cleared by the FDA receiving 510(k) clearance for use in pre-operative surgical planning.

OpenSight is intended to enable users to display, manipulate, and evaluate 2D, 3D, and 4D digital images acquired from CR, DX, CT, MR, and PT sources. It is intended to visualize 3D imaging holograms of the patient, on the patient, for pre-operative localization and pre-operative planning of surgical options. OpenSight is designed for use only with performance-tested hardware specified in the user documentation.

OpenSight is intended to enable users to segment previously acquired 3D datasets, overlay, and register these 3D segmented datasets with the same anatomy of the patient in order to support pre-operative analysis.

OpenSight is intended for use by trained healthcare professionals, including surgeons, radiologists, chiropractors, physicians, cardiologists, technologists, and medical educators. The device assists doctors to better understand the anatomy and pathology of the patient.

The OpenSight Augmented Reality system uses the Microsoft HoloLens hardware and the Microsoft 10 Operating System as the platform on which this system runs. The OpenSight technology is written specifically for this hardware.

(“Novarad OpenSight 510(k) Submission | 2018,” 2018, p. 5)

via First HoloLens application gets FDA approval for pre-operative planning
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FDA clears HoloLens for medical use in “pre-operative surgical planning” | On MSFT

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OnMSFT credited story photo

I tried to wrap my head around 4D imaging; all it did was make my mind hurt at this hour.

The FDA cleared the Microsoft HoloLens for 510(k) clearance to the OpenSight Augmented Reality System. OpenSight is the first AR (augmented reality) application for use in “pre-operative surgical planning.” As outlined in a press release by Novarad, OpenSight uses 2D, 3D, and 4D images overlayed onto patients’ bodies to provide a visual guide on what doctors may encounter internally during surgery.

via FDA clears HoloLens for medical use in “pre-operative surgical planning” | On MSFT

Regenerative bandage accelerates healing in diabetic wounds – Northwestern Now

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Stained epidermis cells cultured on A5G81 (Credit: Northwestern University via NewAtlas.com)

As a diabetic who have persistent wounds on my right leg, I can identify with any wrap or solution that can help my legs to grow and fluid to flow. For example below, this is a recent photograph of my right leg in a state of lymphedema.

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My right leg as of 5/3/2018

The pink found in the picture is suggestive of healing skin with limited exudence (draining). This has been a condition I’ve lived with for the past 4 years.

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Typical 3-Layer Wrap

A 3-Layer wrap, generally Abdominal Pad with Tritec™ Silver, Kerlix Gause, and Coban™ Wrap. Applied by Wound Care medical professionals with some specialized training, change at least weekly is required; more with excessive drainage.

Imagine a Hydrogel Dressing bandage that can replace the water with protein cells that have a mission to multiply and regenerate new skin. If a wider trial works, my leg prayers will have been answered.

Source: Regenerative bandage accelerates healing in diabetic wounds – Northwestern Now

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Fast Neural Style | TensorFire

H/T to Serdar Yegulalp of Infoworld on this story.

from this: before_manu

to this: f6abc5cf-094d-43a0-823e-5ffda88af886.jpg

with just Javascript and a modern browser, such as Vivaldi 1.11 [chromium 59]

via Fast Neural Style | TensorFire

In Chrome 60, I used my local webcam: The results, 1st is the straight webcam outside the program, 2nd is the output.

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In Firefox 54, again the before (enlarged) and the after.

FF-FireShot Pro Screen Capture #007 - 'Fast Neural Style I TensorFire' - tenso_rs_demos_fast-neural-style

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So as you can see, this works in multiple browsers. Edge is currently not one of them:

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Another reason why Microsoft Edge isn’t happening. Also, the new Windows 10 S limits you to this browser, which can’t get the basics of JavaScript support right.

Medical Data Overload 2.0

Medical Data Overload 2.0

A previously embedded post on the subject discusses the wearables market with the potential to make better medical decisions and outcomes. A drawback of not being endowed with financial resources is that first-hand trial/error is not always possible. Now Verily, one of the Alphabet companies, is finally releasing a device that allows advanced data to be acquired for specific research purposes.

Verily Study Watch is designed with these key features:

  • Multiple physiological and environmental sensors are designed to measure relevant signals for studies spanning cardiovascular, movement disorders, and other areas. Examples include electrocardiogram (ECG), heart rate, electrodermal activity, and inertial movements.
  • A long battery life of up to one week in order to drive better user compliance during longitudinal studies.
  • Large internal storage and data compression allow the device to store weeks’ worth of raw data, thus relaxing the need to frequently sync the device.
  • A powerful processor supports real time algorithms on the device.
  • The firmware is designed to be robust for future extensions, such as over-the-air updates, new algorithms, and user interface upgrades.
  • The display is always on so that time is always shown. The display is low power and high resolution for an appealing look and a robust user interface. Note: currently, only time and certain instructions are displayed. No other information is provided back to the user.

(Harry Xiao, Tushar Parlikar, & David He, 2017)

This product is not currently available for sale, which means the greatest benefit to the targeted community will not be able to participate fully. Granted, it is early in the wearables game regarding the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and thus their mechanisms that revolve around payment and access are not in place. Verily is associated with Google so their cloud will be used. Nothing against their cloud, but for this to become mainstream, the data must be agnostic when it comes to cloud storage, HIPAA requirements, and other aspects of this service.

via VERILY RELEASE STUDY WATCH FOR MEDICAL RESEARCH


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Why data analytics, remote care and interconnectivity are prepared to transform medical care

P/C Fierce Healthcare

One of the points of emphasis on this blog and my other one is the intersection of technology, healthcare, and basic income. Both of the dominant healthcare systems in my region have telehealth facilities and programs. With them not being currently covered by Medicare, there is no opportunity to fully test them as neither system would provide me a free session, and that is their right. Therein lies the rub and large animal in the room that has not been addressed. Without Universal Healthcare and/or Single-Payer, the benefits that are touted below are useless and serves little purpose; this will backfire on the proponents of this tech and everyone will suffer, even the “haves”.

Experts say telehealth and mobile devices will push medical care from the doctor’s office to the home.

As the healthcare industry turns to video conferencing, patient-generated data and modern communication tools, medical visits of the future will look vastly different than the current approach to care.

Technology will take on a distinct role in changing the way patients receive care and how healthcare providers operate within a transformed industry. Using smartphone applications and telehealth technology, medical care in the future “will increasingly take place everywhere but the office,” two healthcare futurists — Eric Topol, director of the Scripps Translational Science Institute, and Ray Dorsey, director of the Center for Health and Technology at the University of Rochester — wrote in Fortune.

RELATED: Eric Topol: Technologies, genomics are pushing adoption of personalized medicine

The op-ed coincided with new research by Dorsey and his colleagues at the University of Rochester Medical Center that showed virtual visits were widely embraced by patients with Parkinson’s disease.

Internet-enabled connectivity will bring together a broad array of specialists and clinical consultants to offer continuous, targeted expertise for patients. Access to real-time data from wearables and mobile devices will drive clinical decisions. Instead of making an appointment, patients will text their doctor for immediate medical advice.

Hospital executives are already preparing for those changes by investing heavily in telehealth solutions and mobile innovation. Systems like Northwell Health and the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center have launched new telehealth service lines, emboldened by research that shows how electronic consults can improve access to care.

RELATED: Most healthcare executives plan to invest in telehealth — here’s why

These changes will be influenced by outside companies that will trigger a new approach to the healthcare ecosystem, Topol and Dorsey write, leading to changing labor demands, evolving clinical practice and even transforming the physical makeup of hospitals.

Plagued by burnout, physicians may be eager to adapt to a technology-inspired healthcare landscape. Sylvia Romm, a pediatrician for Online Care Group and the medical director for American Well wrote on KevinMD that the long, inconsistent hours drove her to explore telemedicine. At the HIMSS conference in February, American Well CEO Roy Schoenberg, M.D., said technology will be “the new opportunity for care delivery.”

Originally published at http://www.fiercehealthcare.com/mobile/why-data-analytics-remote-care-and-interconnectivity-prepared-to-transform-medical-care?mkt_tok=eyJpIjoiTWpFek5XRTRZbUUxTWpNeSIsInQiOiIraDlWWTlodFprNkpXUDRJWWpzeDljWGliMUE2bEpvSnZ0UWY1bG92TmF1ak5COFBDbkhrK1NFdXB5Y0dUM1NiUmtOVkVYRElMXC9OWVA0UTVmeGpXNTdkbmlvRHYzRDNxWUQxQjA5cGxJMEs3M0hiSWZ0SmxacDRlcnM4MDh0QVIifQ%253D%253D&mrkid=748656&utm_medium=nl&utm_source=internal.