John’s Crazy Socks spreads joy, shows power of hiring people with disabilities | Transform from Microsoft

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John and Mark Cronin, of John’s Crazy Socks H/T: Microsoft Transform blog.

This inspiring story slipped past my attention over the past week or so, but I am so glad I found it. Everyone has a talent; So thankful for the opportunity to highlight those who has nearly always been forgotten, but in today’s environment, might as well not even exist.

Then Cronin, who is 22 and has Down syndrome, reflected on his sartorial flair for colorful outfits and socks, a passion that began in fourth grade to the occasional shriek of his older brother: “Dad, you can’t let him go out like that!”

 

But Cronin’s fashion resolve led to his lightbulb idea for John’s Crazy Socks, a flourishing online store launched in late 2016. Based in Huntington, New York, the company has grown into a multi-million-dollar business with an inventory of more than 2,000 unique, cheerful and vibrant socks. They include socks with googly-eyed pineapples, smiling corgis, Van Gogh’s “Starry Night” and trolls with hair you can comb.

 

“They’re fun, colorful, creative and let me be me,” Cronin says of his affinity for joyous footwear.

John’s Crazy Socks spreads joy, shows power of hiring people with disabilities | Transform

via Tumblr https://ift.tt/2D8W4sZ published on October 29, 2018 at 08:11PM

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Could basic income help the emancipation of people with disabilities?

Admin cost of benefits II

CN Picture Basic Income Plus from Website

This is a 2-month-old article just brought to my attention by Scott Santens, an advocate for Universal Basic Income. What is happening right now is Sen. Kamala Harris (D-CA) has made a bold proposal that has some roots in Basic Income but using the tax code to effect it (Lowrey, 2018 para. 2).

Could basic income help the emancipation of people with disabilities?:

via Tumblr https://ift.tt/2PR6dgg published on October 19, 2018, at 10:39PM Continue reading

Voice dictation coming to Microsoft’s Office web apps

Made by Dislexia screenshot

Caveat: Some platforms do not include voice capabilities natively.

Voice dictation coming to Microsoft’s Office web apps:

via Tumblr https://ift.tt/2NG16xT published on October 15, 2018 at 08:47PM

Announcing the first AI for Accessibility grantee: Zyrobotics

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Satya Nadella (C) with Zyrobotics CEO Dr. Johnetta MacCalla (L) and CTO Dr. Ayanna Howard (R) courtesy of Microsoft

Announcing the first AI for Accessibility grantee: Zyrobotics

via Tumblr https://ift.tt/2RvhjJ5 published on October 06, 2018 at 02:33AM

Windows 10 accessibility in the October 2018 Update – Windows Experience Blog

Windows 10 accessibility in the October 2018 Update – Windows Experience Blog

via Tumblr https://ift.tt/2QqtnKq published on October 04, 2018 at 08:55PM

The accessibility team helping make our products work for everyone | Google Keyword

credit: Google

Finally, Google is joining the Disability club that Microsoft has been at for a while now. Mind you, I tend to follow what Microsoft does closer than Google, but all platform vendors are welcome to the party, even Apple!

As part of Disability Awareness Month, a look at our efforts around accessibility and the work of the Central Accessibility Team.

Source: The accessibility team helping make our products work for everyone

also crossposted from HerbieD #a11y my Tumblr blog specifically for accessibility.

Data guru living with ALS modernizes industries by typing with his eyes| Microsoft a11y

Data guru living with ALS modernizes industries by typing with his eyes| Microsoft a11y

Inspiration. Tech companies want to highlight their stories on how their products make events like this possible. Microsoft lives this reality and is uniquely positioned to make it happen. I am so glad that they chose this route, and accelerated it with Satya Nadella at the helm.

Source: Data guru living with ALS modernizes industries by typing with his eyes – Stories

Most of this technology that is used in gaming and accessibility ultimately has its roots in the Kinect sensor, essentially gone but not forgotten. Doing backgrounder work on this topic, obvious to me that these sensors allow the software to interpret what is seen and can act upon it, without being called out as such. Down the road as the Virtual Reality market matures, devices like this will be as ubiquitous as smartphones and touch screens are today. Devices such as the Tobii Eye Tracker 4C are an interim step prior to the aforementioned VR.

also posted to my a11y blog @ Tumblr.