The Christchurch Call and steps to tackle terrorist and violent extremist content | Microsoft on the Issues

The Christchurch Call and steps to tackle terrorist and violent extremist content | Microsoft on the Issues

This course of action is the smart and wise thing to do as a society and a government. Then there is POTUS45 (Paywall).

On May 15, New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and French President Emmanuel Macron brought together government leaders and representatives of technology companies to announce the “Christchurch Call to Action To Eliminate Terrorist and Violent Extremist Content Online.” In response to the Call, Amazon, Facebook, Google, Twitter and Microsoft issued a joint statement. The companies also published nine steps they’ll take to implement the Christchurch Call.

The terrorist attacks in Christchurch, New Zealand, in March were a horrifying tragedy. And so it is right that we come together, resolute in our commitment to ensure we are doing all we can to fight the hatred and extremism that lead to terrorist violence.

<snip>

– Amazon, Facebook, Google, Microsoft, Twitter

________________________________________________

In addition to signing the Christchurch Call, Amazon, Facebook, Google, Twitter and Microsoft are publishing nine steps that they will take to address the abuse of technology to spread terrorist and violent extremist content. These nine steps include five individual actions that each company is committing to take, and a further four collaborative actions they’ll take together <snipped>.

 

As online content sharing service providers, we commit to the following:

Five Individual Actions

 

  • Terms of Use. We commit to updating our terms of use, community standards, codes of conduct, and acceptable use policies to expressly prohibit the distribution of terrorist and violent extremist content.

 

  • User Reporting of Terrorist and Violent Extremist Content. We commit to establishing one or more methods within our online platforms and services for users to report or flag inappropriate content, including terrorist and violent extremist content.

 

  • Enhancing Technology. We commit to continuing to invest in technology that improves our capability to detect and remove terrorist and violent extremist content online, including the extension or development of digital fingerprinting and AI-based technology solutions.

 

  • Livestreaming. We commit to identifying appropriate checks on livestreaming, aimed at reducing the risk of disseminating terrorist and violent extremist content online. 

 

  • Transparency Reports. We commit to publishing on a regular basis transparency reports regarding detection and removal of terrorist or violent extremist content on our online platforms and services and ensuring that the data is supported by a reasonable and explainable methodology.

 

<snip>

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PyDev of the Week: Mike Grouchy | The Mouse Vs. The Python

PyDev of the Week: Mike Grouchy | The Mouse Vs. The Python

May the glorious of New Years be upon the fans of this blog and everyone else as well.

This week we welcome Mike Grouchy (@mgrouchy) as our PyDev of the Week. Mike co-founded PyCoder’s Weekly along with Mahdi Yusuf (@myusuf3). He is also the creator of Django Stronghold, a fun Django package you should check out. Let’s take a few moments to get to know Mike better!

 

Can you tell us a little about yourself (hobbies, education, etc):

 

I currently work as the VP of Engineering at a Startup called PageCloud I am also one of the co-founders/creators/curators of Pycoders Weekly a weekly Python newsletter. As for my background, I’m from St.Johns Newfoundland on the east coast of Canada. I got a BSc in computer science at Memorial University there and then moved to Ottawa, Ontario after that to work (a short stint working in the Canadian government and startups since).

 

Why did you start using Python?

 

I played around with Python a little bit in my teen years writing little scripts for automating things and whatnot but I started to get into Python seriously working at my university in the computer science department.

 

What other programming languages do you know and which is your favorite?

 

Python is definitely my favorite language (and the one I am best at) but I have professionally written C, C++, C#, java, VB, JavaScript. I have also dabbled a bit with plenty of other languages but my experience is so small they aren’t even worth calling out.

 

from The Mouse Vs. The Python

Universal Basic Income, Canada Style | PBS NewsHour

I have blogged about UBI for a minute now and still believe in its concept. Our neighbors to our north have made an official attempt at it (though later eliminated). Proven to work around the world, political courage is needed to adopt on a wider scale in the United States. Andrew Yang may be a long-shot for the Presidency, but he is advocating this social experiment. The hope is that it becomes part of the platform for 2020 and after last night’s election results, could be part of the incentive to continue the momentum and increase voter turnout, especially if paired with the removal of cannabis as a schedule 1 drug at a minimum.

The story attached to the video is older but still timely.