How Microsoft Azure affects YOU and is way more exciting than you think | A Certified Warditorial

I am a large but not famous Microsoft fan, but where we are in 2019 proves that Scott McNealy from Sun Microsystems was correct BITD. “The Network is the Computer”. This is why Azure and AWS are leaders in the cloud space, with Google, IBM, and Sun successor Oracle lagging behind.

Microsoft’s Azure Cloud talk seems boring and mundane, but it’s actually where all of the action is.

 

Microsoft’s Azure cloud talk is boring to most phone- and gaming-obsessed tech enthusiasts. For most the cloud is that intangible thing, that does invisible stuff, that we know, like air, is important but isn’t very exciting to talk about, much less read about.

 

But for a world that every tech enthusiast knows is heading toward an increasingly cloud-dependent future – the cloud is literally where nearly all of the action will be. It’s already happening. Many people assume because of Microsoft’s high-profile failure with phones (and other consumer products) that the company lacks insight. Critics often view Microsoft’s cloud commitment as a narrow enterprise-focused distraction which contributed Windows phones downfall. I agree neglecting Windows phones should not have happened, but investing in the cloud is not a mistake.

 

Microsoft is wise to build a scalable Azure cloud computing foundation that will touch everything and virtually everyone on the planet. Microsoft’s Azure is targeting enterprise customers and employees, personal productivity for consumers, gaming, mixed reality, IoT for morning coffee, intelligent cars and much more. With a focus on four platforms: Microsoft Azure, Dynamics 365 and Power Platform, Microsoft 365 and Microsoft Gaming, Microsoft is positioning Azure as the world’s computer. If you think Azure doesn’t matter to you – think again.

 


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Samsung’s Galaxy Fold woes validate Microsoft’s Surface Andromeda caution a Certified Warditorial

The 2019 technology marketplace for platform vendors has evolved, and Microsoft has made headway with it. In the Nadella era, the phrase, “don’t buy anything MS until the 3rd try” is mostly a thing of the past. Could it be that Microsoft’s mobile strategy is counterpunch when others fall, such as Samsung? This is the most recent black eye for the company (remember the Galaxy Note 7?). Not that I could even think of affording one, but for $2000, it better work perfectly. That’s 2 Surface Pros plus a decent phone.

Samsung’s Galaxy Fold was hit by early display issues and is now delayed — was Microsoft wise in not playing its foldable pocket PC Surface Andromeda card so soon?

 

Microsoft’s rumored Surface Andromeda pocket foldable PC is the dream device of many a Windows phone enthusiast. But the nightmare Samsung is enduring thanks to the early failures of its $2000 Galaxy Fold proves that some dreams are better deferred.

 

I have been writing about Microsoft’s inking focused pocket PC dreams since 2015. Skeptics, wary of Microsoft’s commitment to mobile initially dismissed this analysis. Over the years various leaks, Microsoft patents, the canceled Microsoft Courier and a leaked internal Microsoft email last year have confirmed not only Microsoft’s interest in pocketable folding mobile technology but its work toward bringing such an innovative device to market that “blurs the lines between mobile and PC.”

 


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How Microsoft is helping other companies hire people with autism | A Certified Warditorial

Just as Microsoft makes its technology available to other companies to help them achieve more, it is doing the same with its model for hiring people with autism.

 

April is Autism Awareness Month. Autism Spectrum Disorder affects one percent of the world’s population, about 3.5 million, or one out of 59 American births according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention and the Autism Society.

 

Autism Spectrum Disorder encompasses a range of conditions that present challenges with speech, social skills, non-verbal communication, and repetitive behaviors. On the flip side, many people with autism possess unique strengths in other areas that enable them to excel in certain disciplines.

 

Unfortunately, according to Easter Seals, 80% of people with autism are either unemployed or underemployed. Consequently, the skills and contributions that they would bring to many companies and to the products and services those companies offer are lost.

 

To address this untapped resource and to foster a culture of empathy and inclusion, Microsoft — on Autism Awareness Day in 2015 — established its Autism Hiring Program. This year, parallel to its commitment to open sourcing its technologies and tools to create a “Microsoft platform” that companies integrate into their businesses, the company is “democratizing” its Autism Hiring program. The goal is to bring more people with autism to the workforce so that they and the companies they join can achieve more.

 

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Microsoft is pursuing three mobile goals and smartphones isn’t one of them. A certified Warditorial

Microsoft’s smartphone-focused mobile efforts failed, but it’s not done in mobile. Here are three areas where Microsoft is pursuing a mobile presence.

Microsoft’s smartphone efforts failed, but its still pursuing three distinct mobile strategies. Smartphones and mobile, though used synonymously are not the same. Simply put, all smartphones are mobile devices, but not all mobile devices are smartphones. The evolution of the smartphone model including the slate-shaped hardware, app-based ecosystem, carrier-dominated communication, financial and distribution infrastructure and entrenched consumer and developer base lead many to believe this particular manifestation of mobile is immutable and enduring.

The reality, however, is that technology and the social, economic and cultural structures in which it’s intertwined are ever-changing while core things we do with it remain unchanged. For example, communication, entertainment, and simplifying tasks are central to technologies from the telegraph, CD Player and banking that were replaced first by telephones, MP3 players and ATMs and then (to some extent) by smartphones and apps. The technology changed but what we do with it in its evolving forms has not. Technology is the medium, not the focus, by which tasks are accomplished.

Consequently, Microsoft is pursuing three, non-smartphone, areas it hopes will support its mobile presence in the communication-computing space where collaboration, entertainment and getting things done is the focus. Cross-platform apps are the current approach, foldable mobile devices are its post-smartphone investment, and mixed reality is its long-term vision.

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Microsoft plans to focus even more on accessibility in 2019 a certified Warditorial

by Jason Ward, an astute observer of all things Microsoft not named Mary Jo Foley.

 

Microsoft’s CEO Satya Nadella is on a mission to make all the company’s products and services accessible to everyone.

 

If it seems like Microsoft’s accessibility efforts are getting almost as much attention as its cloud, Windows and productivity businesses, you’re not mistaken. Since becoming the company’s CEO, Satya Nadella has made “inclusive design” a core part of the company’s business model. It is almost impossible to see a major Microsoft event or hear a significant Microsoft announcement without hearing how accessibility is woven in.

 

Nadella acknowledged that historically companies, including Microsoft, would build products and address an accessibility “checklist” after the fact. This post-design focus on assistive technologies was limiting because it resulted in narrowly designing products for able-bodied people while excluding millions of others with disabilities.

 

from Windows Central – News, Forums, Reviews, Help for Windows 10 and all things Microsoft. http://bit.ly/2RRYzqy

How Microsoft’s Reward Program could make Bing a better Google competitor a certified Warditorial

Image Credits Windows Central/Jason Ward & Youth Village 

Let’s keep it real here, if Microsoft wasn’t paying you to use bing, would you actually use it? My answer is almost always No. Jason Ward highlights this reality. BTW, it has helped me build my Amazon Gift Card balances to the point where when my mobile carrier introduced a plan with Amazon Plan included, this was a perfect match for me.

Microsoft has a Rewards Program through which it pays ou to use its Bing search engine. If you haven’t heard of it, you’re not alone.

 

Last year I wrote how Microsoft is paying me (and could pay you) to use Bing. I received feedback from individuals outside of “Microsoft’s universe” — non-Microsoft enthusiasts — inquiring if Microsoft’s Rewards Program was the real deal. I assured them that it was.

 

Still, those exchanges highlighted a reality that many Microsoft enthusiasts and perhaps Microsoft itself takes for granted. Not everyone is aware of something simply because it’s part of another product. In other words, the marketing strategy of integrating products within other products hoping for an organic promotion of that product isn’t always sufficient to create its awareness.

 

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