PyDev of the Week: Vuyisile Ndlovu | The Mouse vs The Python

PyDev of the Week: Vuyisile Ndlovu | The Mouse vs The Python

This week we welcome Vuyisile Ndlovu (@terrameijar) as our PyDev of the Week! Vuyisile is a contributor to Real Python and a Python blogger on his own website. He is also active in the Python community in Africa. You can find out more about Vuyisile on his website or by checking out his Github profile. Let’s take some time to get to know him better!

VuyisileNdlovu
This Week’s Subject: Vuyisile Ndlovu courtesy of Mike Driscoll

Can you tell us a little about yourself (hobbies, education, etc):

I’m a developer from Bulawayo, Zimbabwe. I have always been fascinated by computers so after I completed High School, I enrolled for an I.T Diploma program at a local community college that had programming as part of the curriculum. Unfortunately, my situation changed and I couldn’t graduate in the end. I switched to teaching myself computer science topics and programming through online courses and books.

When I’m not working on code, I like to work on woodworking projects in the backyard and taking my dogs for regular walks. Doing this allows me to take a break from tech, be creative in different ways and also get some exercise.

Why did you start using Python?

I was a core contributor to the Mozilla project for a few years and one of the teams I worked with used Python extensively for automating their work. I liked how simple and intuitive Python looked so I started learning it. Compared to C++, which is what I was used to, the Python syntax was easier for me to understand and I loved that it could be used for Web Development, which is an area I have an interest in. As I learned more about the language, I realised that it has an amazing community and since then I’ve made a lot of friends from being a part of the Python community and this is one of the reasons that reinforced my desire to keep using Python.

What other programming languages do you know and which is your favorite?

I don’t have a favorite language yet because I haven’t been programming for a long time and I know that different languages are suited for different things. I’m learning JavaScript and back in college, I took C++ and Visual Basic classes. I teach programming classes at a High School using VB.Net because I find that using Visual Basic makes building GUIs in a Windows environment easy and the language is relatively simple to teach to beginners.

The work projects I work on are web projects and I enjoy using Python and Django to build those out.

Thanks for doing the interview, Vuyisile!

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PyDev of the Week: David Fischer | The Mouse vs The Python

PyDev of the Week: David Fischer | The Mouse vs The Python

This week we welcome David Fischer (@djfische) as our PyDev of the Week! David is an organizer of the San Diego Python user’s group. He also works for Read the Docs. You can see what David has been up to on his website or check out what he’s been up to on Github. Let’s take a few moments to get to know David better!

Can you tell us a little about yourself (hobbies, education, etc):

I am one of the organizers of the San Diego Python meetup and I’ve been doing that since early 2012, but my hobbies nowadays mostly involve spending time with my 3 year old daughter. I also really enjoy games of all kinds from in-person board and card games to computer games and my daughter is just about the right age to start introducing this stuff.

I have a bachelor’s degree in applied math and despite the name that involved a lot of programming. Mostly I learned Java in college which outside of some Android development I’ve barely used since.

For work, I previously worked at Qualcomm, Amazon, and a beer-tech related startup (how San Diego!). I currently work on Read the Docs. I’ve had the opportunity to work on lots of different things from web apps, mobile apps, technical sales/marketing, scalability, security, and privacy. I don’t want to rule out working for big companies, but the small company life seems like a better fit for me.

Perhaps this comes out of some of my security and privacy work, but I try not to participate much on social media. I was surprised to be contacted to do this interview because I think of myself as having a pretty low profile in the Python community outside of San Diego. I’m happy to do it, though.

Why did you start using Python?

I first learned Python in a college class where we had a project in a new programming language every 3 weeks or so. We also learned JavaScript, a Lisp-like language called ML, and Prolog. My opinions on programming weren’t very well formed back then but I remember really liking Python relative to the others. I think I was using Python 2.3 or maybe a 2.4 beta version. The Python docs were much more brightly colored back then.

I didn’t do any Python after that for around 4-5 years but I came back to it when I needed to create something that ended up like a bad version of mitmproxy (although mitmproxy didn’t exist yet). I really enjoyed working on that project and in Python and this is probably the only time this has happened to me but I remember looking up from my work and it was after midnight. I hadn’t eaten dinner and everybody else at work had gone home hours ago. I was hooked and I’ve been doing mostly Python ever since.

What other programming languages do you know and which is your favorite?

It’s been about a decade now, but I was a professional PHP developer for a few years. Sometimes, the language gets a bad reputation in the Python community but I always thought it was alright and it does have some areas the Python ecosystem could learn from. Today, I mostly work in Python with some JavaScript. Python is definitely my favorite.

Thanks for doing the interview, David!

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PyDev of the Week: Aymeric Augustin | The Mouse vs The Python

PyDev of the Week: Aymeric Augustin | The Mouse vs The Python

This week we welcome Aymeric Augustin (@aymericaugustin) as our PyDev of the Week. Aymeric is a core developer of Django, a Python web framework. He is also an entrepreneur and speaker at several Django related conferences. You can catch up with Aymeric over on his website or check out his FOSS contributions on Github. Let’s take a few moments to get to know him better!

Aymeric Augustin

Can you tell us a little about yourself (hobbies, education, etc):

Do you know how to spot a Frenchman? That’s always the first thing they mention! Now that’s out of the way…

These days my hobbies center around being the dad of three wonderful girls 🙂 We’re doing a lot of physical activity together: swimming, cycling, gardening, playing music, etc.

I’m managing a software engineering department of about 200 people at CANAL+, a French audiovisual media group that operates TV services in several countries.

I was trained as a generalist engineer, eventually specializing in Computer Science and Information Technology, but I learnt most of what I do on the job.

Why did you start using Python?

In 2006, a friend told me about this great, simple language called Python. At first, I dismissed it: I said that PHP was simple enough for anything I wanted to do. This ranks quite high on the long list of stupid things I said 🙂

One year later, I was doing an internship at (now defunct) Zonbu, living the startup life in Palo Alto. That’s when I wrote my first Python application. It was a desktop GUI for encoding videos such that they’d play on iPods or on the just-released iPhone. I built it with PyGTK and glade. Under the hood, it ran mencoder and MP4box.

I dug out the source code from my archives for this interview. Not only did it use tabs for indentation and backslashes for line breaks, but it also sported an elegant logging system:

if __debug__:
    print("INFO: Initializing BackgroundEncoder")

Then, in 2009, in my first job, I wrote two non-trivial Python projects. I was working on an in-train entertainment portal. The first one centralized onboard communications between the web portal and the network infrastructure. The second one managed content synchronization depending on available network connectivity. I had discovered the concept of automated tests and I was very proud of my test coverage.

What other programming languages do you know and which is your favorite?

My first language was Basic, first FutureBASIC in 1995 and later TI-BASIC. Then a friend introduced me to HTML and the World Wide Web in 1997. Together, we made a website for our high school.

My Computer Science courses were mostly in Caml — a great language for the mathematically oriented but little known outside French academia, Java, and C. I also had the opportunity to try other interesting languages such as Erlang, Factor, Haskell, and Scheme.

I still enjoy writing small bits of C, mostly for Python extensions. I haven’t used Java since 1.5 was the latest and greatest. I can’t claim I still know it. I tried C# .NET around the same time. I didn’t like it because the documentation always told me what I knew already and never what I wanted to know.

Outside courses, I wrote a lot of PHP. If you’re reading this, you’re probably aware of the challenges of writing significant projects in PHP. However, I wouldn’t be here without PHP, so I’m grateful that it exists. Step by step, I went from static HTML to small dynamic bits, then to factoring out repeated sections, then to writing my own mini-framework, then to Python and Django. That was a good learning path.

Professionally, besides Python, I’ve been writing JavaScript and CSS. I taught myself modern full-stack development when I co-founded Otherwise — because being the CTO at a start-up means you’re the only developer at first. Earlier in my career, I also wrote some Ruby, but I was more comfortable with Django than with Rails.

Purely from a language perspective, I still like Caml a lot. I’m certainly romanticizing memories of when I learnt programming 🙂 Anyway, sometimes I feel like I’m a static typing fan lost in Python land!…

Thanks for doing the interview, Aymeric

 

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PyDev of the Week: Frank Wiles | The Mouse vs The Python

PyDev of the Week: Frank Wiles | The Mouse vs The Python

This week we welcome Frank Wiles (@fwiles) as our PyDev of the Week! Frank is the President and Founder of Revolution Systems and President of the Django Software Foundation. If you’d like to know about Frank, you should take a moment to check out his website or his Github account. For now, let’s take some time to get to know him better!

Can you tell us a little about yourself (hobbies, education, etc):

I grew up in a small town in Kansas, about 10,000 people, so computers became a hobby early in life. Other than that I really enjoy cooking and when I have time some photography, but these days it’s mostly just taking photos of the kiddos.

I attended Kansas University for awhile as a CS major and then switched to Business before ultimately dropping out during the dotcom boom.

Frank Wiles

Why did you start using Python?

I started using Python in 2008 and it quickly became my primary language. At the time I was sharing an office with Jacob Kaplan-Moss and our friend Rikki knew that and wanted me to write an article that was part interview of him about the recent creation of the Django Software Foundation and part quick intro to Django.

I said sure and then realized, crap now I have to learn Python and Django.

I quickly realized that Django was better than what I was currently using and that I found Python to be really great as well. In hindsight, I’m really glad I was gently nudged in this direction.

You can actually still find a slightly broken version of the article online.

What other programming languages do you know and which is your favorite?

I was primarily a Perl person for about a decade, even writing a book on it with a friend back in 2001 but I haven’t used it in at least 10 years.

I know enough C/C++ and Go to be dangerous. I’d like to do a larger project in Go at some point but have yet to find the time. I’m also half-heartedly teaching myself Rust, but haven’t done anything serious with it yet. But from what I’ve seen it has a place in my bag of tricks in the future.

Python is obviously my favorite and the tool I always reach for first…

 

Thanks for doing the interview, Frank!

 

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PyDev of the Week: William Vincent | The Mouse Vs. The Python

This week we welcome William Vincent (@wsv3000) as our PyDev of the Week! William is the author of 3 books on the Django web framework, including Django for Beginners. You can find out more about what William is up to on his website where he writes about Python, Django and more. Let’s take a few moments to get to know him better!

Can you tell us a little about yourself (hobbies, education, etc):

 

I have a “non-traditional” background in that I started my career as a book editor, transitioned into startups on the business side, and finally in my 30s learned how to code and now work as a software engineer and teacher. I basically locked myself in a room for two years and learned how to code, founded my first startup, and went through a lot of ups and downs along the way. 

 

Why did you start using Python?

 

I started programming in earnest back in 2012 while I was living in San Francisco and working at Quizlet. At the time, the choice was either Ruby on Rails or Python/Django among the other startups I knew. I chose Python because I needed to pick something and I liked the idea that Python could be broadly used beyond just web development, unlike Ruby.

 

What other programming languages do you know and which is your favorite?

 

I always find it interesting to experiment with other languages. Lisp in particular was mind-blowing. But day-to-day I mainly use JavaScript as my other language of choice. It has some warts but I really like using it and don’t find it off-putting at all. It’s become a lot more Pythonic with ES6 features.

 

 

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