We’re increasing our carbon fee as we double down on sustainability | Microsoft on the Issues

Phot of forest trees being inventoried
Image of trees with data and insights provided by Microsoft AI.

Since 2009, Microsoft has made and met a series of commitments to reduce the company’s carbon footprint. While we’ve made progress toward our goal of cutting our operational carbon emissions by 75 percent by 2030, the magnitude and speed of the world’s environmental changes have made it increasingly clear that we must do more. And we are taking new steps to do just that.

 

Today, I’d like to share new steps we’re taking in four areas:

 

Building sustainable campuses and data centers

 

Accelerating research through data science

 

Helping our customers build sustainable solutions

 

Advocating for environmental policy change

 

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An important step toward peace and security in the digital world – Microsoft on the issues.

An important step toward peace and security in the digital world – Microsoft on the issues.

Today, French President Emmanuel Macron launched a global effort among governments, businesses and civil society to protect and defend against threats to the digital infrastructure that runs our daily lives. We’re proud to be one of the 370 signatories of The Paris Call for Trust and Security in Cyberspace. This includes 51 governments from around the world, including all 28 members of the European Union and 27 of the 29 NATO members. It also includes key governments from other parts of the world, including Japan, South Korea, Mexico, Colombia and New Zealand.

 

The Paris Call is an important step on the path toward digital peace, creating a stronger foundation for progress ahead. It calls for strong commitments in support of clear principles and strong norms to protect citizens and civilian infrastructure from systemic or indiscriminate cyberattacks. Similarly, it calls for governments, tech companies and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) to work together to protect our democracies and electoral processes from nation-state cyberthreats.

 

The Paris Call breaks new ground by bringing together to support these steps an unprecedented and broad array of supporters. Its signatories include more than 200 companies and business associations, including leading tech companies such as Microsoft, Google, Facebook, Intel, Ericsson, Samsung, Accenture, Fujitsu, SAP, Salesforce and Hitachi. Importantly, it also includes leading financial services institutions such as Citigroup, Mastercard, Visa, Deutsche Bank, as well as industrial leaders such as Nestle, Lufthansa and Schneider Electric. And it includes almost 100 critical NGOs that span groups across civil society.

 

All of this is important for a reason. Success in advancing cybersecurity requires an approach that is not only multinational, but multistakeholder in nature. This is because cyberspace, unlike the traditional planes of warfare like land, sea and air, is typically privately owned. Cyberspace in fact consists of concrete elements in the real world, such as datacenters, undersea cables, and laptops and mobile devices. These are designed and manufactured by private companies. And often they are owned and operated by tech companies and others in the private sector.

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Buying renewable energy should be easy — here’s one way to make it less complex – Microsoft on the Issues

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iStock photo on Microsoft’s blog.

My favorite tech company is at it again, leading the industry into renewables. What this blog post is about is that the idea of weather and price risks that is common to most energy markets has a solution that involves insurance risks and essentially hedging, like what airlines do for fuel prices.

An average US major Boeing 757-200 flies 1,252 mi (2,015 km) stages 11.3 block hours per day and costs $2,550 per block hour: $923 of ownership, $590 of maintenance, $548 of fuel and $489 of crew; or $13.34 per 186 seats per block hour (“Airline,” 2018).

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