Global Internet Forum to Counter Terrorism: An update on our progress two years on | Microsoft on the Issues

Global Internet Forum to Counter Terrorism: An update on our progress two years on | Microsoft on the Issues

The following announcement was jointly written by Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, and Microsoft and posted to our respective online properties.

In summer 2017, Facebook, YouTube, Microsoft, and Twitter came together to form the Global Internet Forum to Counter Terrorism (GIFCT).

The objective of the GIFCT has always been to substantially disrupt terrorists’ ability to promote terrorism, disseminate violent extremist propaganda, and exploit or glorify real-world acts of violence on our services. We do this by joining forces with counterterrorism experts in government, civil society and the wider industry around the world. Our work centers around three, interrelated strategies:

  • Joint tech innovation
  • Knowledge sharing
  • Conducting and funding research

Today, building on the commitments we made as part of the Christchurch Call to Action, we are adding a fourth pillar to our work that will focus on crisis response. Specifically, we are introducing joint content incident protocols for responding to emerging or active events like the horrific terrorist attack in Christchurch, so that relevant information can be quickly and efficiently shared, processed and acted upon by all member companies. We are also releasing our first GIFCT Transparency Report and a new counterspeech campaign toolkit that will help activists and civil society organizations challenge the voices of extremism online.

And as we head into our third year as GIFCT, we are pleased to welcome Pinterest and Dropbox as members. We will continue to add new members, particularly smaller companies that could benefit from the collective experience of GIFCT members.

More than 200,000 unique hashes now in our joint database

When terrorists misuse the internet, they often upload the same piece of content to multiple platforms to maximize their reach. To disrupt this behavior, we jointly developed a shared industry database of “hashes” — or digital fingerprints — that allows us to safely share known terrorist images and video propaganda with partner companies. This enables us to more quickly identify and take action against potential terrorist content on our respective platforms…

First GIFCT Transparency Report

We have heard loud and clear from government and civil society that we need to be more transparent about what we are working on as an industry. As a result, today we are releasing our first-ever GIFCT Transparency Report. The report goes into detail about the GIFCT’s primary work streams, providing greater insight into how the Hash Sharing Consortium has defined terrorist content, and the volume and types of content included in the database. The full transparency report, which is available here, will complement the transparency reports put out by individual GIFCT member companies.

A toolkit to counter violent extremism

When we committed to the Christchurch Call to Action and issued a nine-point plan outlining concrete steps we plan to take as an industry, we said, “We come together, resolute in our commitment to ensure we are doing all we can to fight the hatred and extremism that lead to terrorist violence.” Never has that commitment been more important. As industry partners, we continue to prioritize and deepen engagement with governments, civil society, and smaller tech companies around the world…

Enabling and empowering companies to respond to crises like Christchurch

Perhaps most importantly, today we are adding a fourth pillar to the GIFCT’s core mission: enabling and empowering companies to respond to crises like Christchurch. The horrific terrorist attack highlighted the importance of close communication between members, and between government and the wider industry, which is why we are introducing joint content incident protocols to enable and empower companies to more quickly and effectively respond to emerging and active events…

We are grateful for the support of and collaboration with governments, international organizations, and NGOs around the world, including the EU Internet Forum and the UN Counter-Terrorism Executive Directorate. We look forward to sharing more updates in the coming months.

The post: Global Internet Forum to Counter Terrorism: An update on our progress two years on appeared first on Microsoft on the Issues.

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The accessibility team helping make our products work for everyone | Google Keyword

credit: Google

Finally, Google is joining the Disability club that Microsoft has been at for a while now. Mind you, I tend to follow what Microsoft does closer than Google, but all platform vendors are welcome to the party, even Apple!

As part of Disability Awareness Month, a look at our efforts around accessibility and the work of the Central Accessibility Team.

Source: The accessibility team helping make our products work for everyone

also crossposted from HerbieD #a11y my Tumblr blog specifically for accessibility.

The EFF calls out Google for privacy issues in the EDU sector but the school districts need educated, too – Android Central

The EFF calls out Google for privacy issues in the EDU sector but the school districts need educated, too – Android Central

The author, who I make a point to read whenever he writes, is pointing fingers at Google for privacy issues (where have we heard this before?) in the education market, which they have Windows PC-like control of. Google’s business model and privacy needs can co-exist if done properly. Unlike Apple or Microsoft, Google’s approach is essentially

here is the hardware and software in our cloud, now go run with it.

There is nothing inherently wrong with that approach and could be tied to cost savings compared to traditional school vendors. Handholding and administration outside of internal staff must be made available, and Google does not have a history of having an inside sales support force or some of the assets in place, thus the rub.

Microsoft is rumored to have a direct answer to this market by introducing a version of Windows 10 that is locked down, modern RT if you will. This time it is for Universal Windows Programs only. The selling point is that you can get a locked down device, but should the end user or administrator desire and pay a fee, it can be upgraded to full Windows 10 Home or Pro edition. This way you can have the best of both productivity worlds and can be executed today, unlike other devices announced. This will put a dent into Google’s dominance of the 3-12 education market, and make inroads in undergraduate studies with the upgrade options. The upgrade fee for educational buyers needs to include Office 365, OneDrive, and Skype automatically for up to 4 years. Pricing somewhere along the lines of $100 home and $150 pro. Currently $120 for home, $200 for pro, and $80 for Office University. Should Microsoft hit a home run with this in 2017, you better believe that the Electronic Freedom Foundation will have them in the crosshairs.

via The EFF calls out Google for privacy issues in the EDU sector but the school districts need educated, too | Android Central