How Cloud Computing Can Help Solve Coronavirus | The New Stack

How Cloud Computing Can Help Solve Coronavirus | The New Stack
A The New Stack image
With Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCov) causing more deaths than the 2003 SARS outbreak and showing no signs of containment, one thing becomes clear: the disease is out of our control right now and we’re going to have to get innovative if we want to catch up with it.

The disease originated in China back in December, and while there’s been a lot of controversy around how it was handled, it’s important to recognize that our energy is best spent finding solutions.

Now, more than ever, the world needs to come together. We have to bring forth the best minds in healthcare and technology and innovate if we’re going to outsmart this disease.

Here is where the 3 main Cloud providers can get together to help solve this issue that affects everyone.

How Cloud Computing Can Help Solve Coronavirus – The New Stack:

https://ift.tt/2Hff0WZ via Tumblr and IFTTT

Digital civility at lowest level in 4 years, new Microsoft research shows | Microsoft on the Issues

Digital civility at lowest level in 4 years, new Microsoft research shows | Microsoft on the Issues

The Microsoft Digital Civility Index (DCI), a measure of the tone and tenor of online interactions as reported by consumers in 25 countries, stands at its lowest level since the survey began. Findings are being released in conjunction with international Safer Internet Day, February 11.

Microsoft’s Digital Civility Index stands at 70%, the highest reading of perceived online incivility since the survey began in 2016, and the first time the DCI has reached the 70th percentile. Moreover, the equally troubling trends of emotional and psychological pain ­– and negative consequences that follow online-risk exposure – both also increased significantly. Results are from “Civility, Safety and Interactions Online – 2019,” which gauged teens’ and adults’ perceptions about online life and their exposure to 21[1] online risks across four categories: reputational, behavioral, sexual and personal/intrusive. The index works like a golf score: The lower the index reading (on a scale from zero to 100), the lower respondents’ risk exposure and the higher the perceived level of online civility among people in that country.

The rest of the post Digital civility at lowest level in 4 years, new Microsoft research shows appeared first on Microsoft on the Issues.

from Microsoft on the Issues https://ift.tt/2UNCgTE
via IFTTT

PyDev of the Week: Paul Sokolovsky | The Mouse vs The Python

PyDev of the Week: Paul Sokolovsky | The Mouse vs The Python

This week we welcome Paul Sokolovsky as our PyDev of the Week! Paul is the creator of Pycopy, which is described as “a minimalist and memory-efficient Python implementation for constrained systems, microcontrollers, and just everything”. You can check out more of his contributions to open source on Github. Let’s take a few moments to get to know Paul better!

Paul Sokolovsky

Can you tell us a little about yourself (hobbies, education, etc):

I have Computer Science as my first masters, and later got another masters in Linguistics – when I was a CS student I was interested in Natural Language Processing subfield of AI, and wanted to get a formal degree to work in that areas, perhaps in academia, but that never panned out, I got sucked up into the IT industry, a common story ;-).

Hobbies – well, nothing special, I like to travel, and even if a plane carries me far away, I like to get on my feet and explore like humans did it for millennia. Though if there’s a motorbike for rent, I like to ride it to a more distant mountain before climbing it. My latest interest is history. Like, everyone took history lessons in school and might have their “favorite” history of a particular country at particular timeframe, but trying to grasp history of mankind across the mentioned millennia is a different matter.

Why did you start using Python?

Oh, as many students, at that age I drooled over Lisp and Scheme programming languages. I did a few projects in them, and while they were definitely great and I could grok them, it occurred to me that I wasn’t not sure about the rest of world. Programming is inherently social activity. And besides the power of those languages, their drawbacks were also evident, and while I was able to surmount them, other people might be not just unable, but even unwilling to do that.

So, I started my quest of the best-in-compromise programming languages, sifting thru dozens of both mainstream and obscure languages of that time. I stopped when I found Python. I think of it as “Lisp for real world”. Those were the times of Python 1.5.1…

What other programming languages do you know and which is your favorite?

Based on the above, it shouldn’t come as surprise that Python is my favorite languages. I know a bunch of scripting languages – Perl, PHP, Java, JavaScript, Lisp, Scheme, and more “systemish” ones like C and C++. I definitely watch the space and keep an eye on Go, Rust which approaching upstream and niche contenders like Nim, Zig, whatever. I don’t rush into using them – again, I passed that stage of language-hopping when I was a student.

Thanks for doing the interview, Paul!

The rest of the post PyDev of the Week: Paul Sokolovsky appeared first on The Mouse Vs. The Python.

from The Mouse Vs. The Python https://ift.tt/2SdPLe0

PyDev of the Week: Alessia Marcolini | The Mouse vs The Python

PyDev of the Week: Alessia Marcolini | The Mouse vs The Python
This week we welcome Alessia Marcolini (@viperale) as our PyDev of the Week! Alessia is a Python blogger and speaker. You can check out some of her work over on Medium. You can also see some of her coding skills on Github. Let’s spend a few moments getting to know her better!

Alessia Marcolini

Can you tell us a little about yourself (hobbies, education, etc):

Hello everybody, my name is Alessia and I’m 21. I come from a little town near Verona, a beautiful city in the north of Italy.

I’ve been living in Trento (Italy) for 2 years and a half now. I moved here to attend university: I’m currently enrolled in the third year of a Bachelor’s degree in Computer Science.

In 2017 I started working part time as a Junior Research Assistant in the Bruno Kessler Foundation, too. FBK is a research foundation based in Trento, working on Science, Technology, and Social Sciences. I’m part of the MPBA unit which focuses on novel applications of Deep Learning from complex data: e.g. Precision Medicine, Imaging and Portable Spectroscopy in industry processes, Nowcasting on time-spatial data. I’m currently working on deep learning frameworks to integrate multiple medical imaging modalities and different clinical data to get more precise prognostic/diagnostic functions.

When not coding, I love dancing and listening to music. I have also been part of a hip hop crew until 2017.

Why did you start using Python?

Well, this dates back to the very first years of my technical high school. We had a teacher who, going against the opinions of many other computer science teachers in my school, decided to teach students in my class Python as the first ever programming language. So, it wasn’t really a choice I made. However, after these six years, I realise how lucky I was to have had that teacher (joking, I realised it even before, I still love that teacher and we are on the best terms but perhaps I did not understand the impact he would have on my future).

What other programming languages do you know and which is your favorite?

It’s difficult to say whether you “know” or you “don’t know” a programming language. I can say that Python is my most practiced language, since I’ve been using it every day at work for three years now. Apart from it, I had the opportunity to practice also Java, C and C++ at school and at university. I also took part in the Italian Olympiad in Informatics in teams for a couple of years and we were required to write our programs in C++.

Anyway, Python is definitely my favourite programming language: it is easy to learn, the syntax is intuitive and with Python you can accomplish tasks with much less code than with other languages. It’s very handy for writing scripts, but at the same time it’s powerful and it gives you the possibility to write an entire object oriented application end-to-end. It can serve multiple areas of application, from web development, to desktop development, to data science.

They say you “Come for the language, Stay for the community”, and this is really one of the aspects I appreciate the most about the Python environment. My experience with the Python community has been awesome and that’s why I always encourage people to come to the Python world (more on this later).

Thanks for doing the interview, Alessia!

The rest of the post PyDev of the Week: Alessia Marcolini appeared first on The Mouse Vs. The Python.

from The Mouse Vs. The Python https://ift.tt/2Se4K69

Using AI to advance the health of people and communities around the world | Microsoft on the Issues

Using AI to advance the health of people and communities around the world | Microsoft on the Issues

The health of people and communities around the world has been improving over time. For example, the steep decline in child and maternal mortality is a key indicator of positive momentum.

However, progress has not been equal across the globe, and there is a great need to focus on societal issues such as reducing health inequity and improving access to care for underserved populations. While researchers work to unlock life-saving discoveries and develop new approaches to pressing health issues, advancements in technology can help accelerate and scale new solutions.

That is why we are launching AI for Health, a new $40 million, five-year program to empower researchers and organizations with AI to improve the health of people and communities around the world. The program is underpinned with a strong foundation of privacy, security and ethics, and was developed in collaboration with leading health experts who are driving important medical initiatives. AI for Health is the fifth Microsoft AI for Good program, a $165 million initiative to empower researchers, nonprofits and organizations with advanced technologies to help unlock solutions to the biggest challenges facing society today.

The AI for Health initiative will focus on three key areas:

  • Quest for discovery. Accelerating medical research to advance prevention, diagnoses and treatment of diseases
  • Global health insights. Increasing our shared understanding of mortality and longevity to protect against global health crises
  • Health equity. Reducing health inequity and improving access to care for underserved populations

AI for Health is a philanthropic initiative that complements our broader work in Microsoft Healthcare. Through AI for Health, we will support specific nonprofits and academic collaboration with Microsoft’s leading data scientists, access to best-in-class AI tools and cloud computing, and select cash grants.

I am honored to lead AI for Health as part of my mission at Microsoft to fuse AI and data to address the world’s greatest challenges. As a tech company, it is our responsibility to ensure that organizations working on the most pressing societal issues have access to our latest AI technology and the expertise of our technical talent.

The rest of this fascinating post Using AI to advance the health of people and communities around the world appeared first on Microsoft on the Issues.

from Microsoft on the Issues https://ift.tt/2vpUTT4
via IFTTT

Phone calls in the Your Phone app now rolling out to regular Windows 10 users

Phone calls in the Your Phone app now rolling out to regular Windows 10 users

In December Microsoft rolled out the ability to make and receive phone calls via the Your Phone app to Windows Insiders. Now the feature is rolling out to regular Windows 10 users…

I just did this, and it works OK. I would eventually like to put in the always run taskbar, so it runs without notice. Not easy to do. I also want the same on my phone as well.

My comment from Flipboard where this was initially placed.

from Microsoft Microsoft Microsoft https://ift.tt/37xBlKS
via IFTTT

PyDev of the Week: Thomas Wouters | The Mouse vs The Python

PyDev of the Week: Thomas Wouters | The Mouse vs The Python

This week we welcome Thomas Wouters (@Yhg1s) as our PyDev of the Week! Thomas is a core developer of the Python language. He is very active in open source in general and has been a director of the Python Software Foundation in the past. Let’s spend some time getting to know him better!

Can you tell us a little about yourself (hobbies, education, etc):

I’m a self-taught programmer, a high school dropout, a core CPython developer, and a former PSF Board Director from Amsterdam, The Netherlands. I’ve been playing with computers for a long time, starting when my parents got a Commodore 64 with a couple books on BASIC, when I was 6 or 7. I learned a lot by just playing around on it. Then in 1994 I discovered the internet, while I was still in high school. This was before the days of the World Wide Web or (most) graphics, but I was sucked in by a programmable MUD, a text-based “adventure” environment, called LambdaMOO. LambdaMOO lets you create your own part of the world by making rooms and objects, and programming their behaviour, in a programming language that was similar to Python (albeit unrelated to it). One thing led to another and I dropped out of high school and got a job at a Dutch ISP (XS4ALL), doing tech support for customers. A year later I moved to the Sysadmin department, where I worked for ten years. I gradually moved from system administration to programming, even before I learned about Python. 

Besides working with computers I also like playing computer games of all kinds, and non-computer games like board games or card games. I do kickboxing, and I have a bunch of lovely cats, about whom I sometimes tweet. I’m pretty active on IRC as well, and I’m a channel owner of #python on Freenode. I also keep ending up in administration-adjacent situations, like the PSF Board of Directors and the Python Steering Council, not so much because I like it but because I don’t mind doing it, I’m apparently not bad at it, and it’s important stuff that needs to be done well.

Why did you start using Python?

While working at XS4ALL, a friend with whom I worked on a TinyMUX-based MUD knew I preferred LambdaMOO, and mentioned that Python was a lot like the MOO language, at least conceptually. I knew BASIC, Perl and C at the time, but I wasn’t particularly happy about any of them. The MOO language had always just seemed more logical, more natural to me. When I finally tried Python, it was an eye-opening experience. Mind you, this was in 1999, and it was Python 1.5.2; compared to Python 3.8, practically the stone age. Still, I fell in love with it instantly. It just fit my brain so nicely. That I was able to easily (compared to the state of the art at the time) use C libraries, or even embed Python in C programs, was an extra bonus. I didn’t get to use Python much at work until I moved to Google, but I did all kinds of hobby programming with it. 

Part of why I kept programming is that I found out how much fun it was to work on CPython itself. I had worked on a number of different C code bases at the time, and CPython’s was the cleanest, most readable, most enjoyable by far. I learned a lot from just reading it, and implementing small features that people asked for. I took a proof-of-concept patch from Michael Hudson to add augmented assignment (+=, *=, etc) and ran with it, getting guidance from Guido himself on a lot of the details. It took a lot longer than I expected, but that ended up becoming PEP 204, and made me a core Python developer. I was just in time to help found the Python Software Foundation as well, which we did in 2003, and I was on its Board of Directors the first three years (and again later).

My involvement with Python also meant I got offered a job at Google, working remotely from Amsterdam, to help maintain Python internally. The rest of my team is in California, and I get to visit them regularly. The work at Google is complex and diverse and challenging enough that after 13 years I’m still not bored.

What other programming languages do you know and which is your favorite?

I know C intimately, and C++ and Java fairly well. I use all three (along with Python) at my day job. I’m also somewhat familiar with Haskell, D, Objective C, and Perl. I used to use Perl a lot at my previous job, but I never enjoyed it and I don’t remember much of it now. My favourite language by far is Python, but C is in a firm second place. I’m familiar enough with its pitfalls that I know when I don’t know something, and where to look it up. I’m also under no illusions about its drawbacks, and would be quite happy if everybody moved to more memory-safe languages. Modern C++ — at least the set of features we’re encouraged to use at work — is also growing on me. The main issue I have with C++ is that it has so many features you shouldn’t use. At work we have a lot of tooling to help us make those choices, which greatly improves the C++ experience.

Thanks for doing the interview, Thomas!

The rest of the post PyDev of the Week: Thomas Wouters appeared first on The Mouse Vs. The Python.