Fuchsia Friday: A first look at the Fuchsia SDK, which you can download…

Fuchsia Friday: A first look at the Fuchsia SDK, which you can download…

The edition for this week covers some technical, development aspects of Fuschia with an emphasis on the Dart language, one of 3 used by Google for the development purposes of their creation. What I find interesting here is that so far, no mention of the Go Language. It sounds like a subject for another episode as I find it hard to believe Go won’t play a huge part in Fuschia, which IMO is designed to be Android without ties to Java, therefore Oracle [successor to Sun Microsystems].

With the significant news this week that the Fuchsia SDK and a Fuchsia “device” are being added to the Android Open Source Project, now seems like a good time to learn more about the Fuchsia SDK.

 

The curious can find a download at the bottom of this article, but I obviously don’t recommend its usage for any major projects as it will swiftly become outdated and/or outright wrong. The tools in the included version are designed for use with 64-bit Linux, so if you’re on OS X, you’re on your own.

 

Not mentioned in the article means you are also on your own regarding Windows.

via Fuschia Friday SDK edition.

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Python: World’s Most Popular Language in 2018 | The Mouse Vs. The Python

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The Mouse vs Python website graphic.

Finally caught up with JavaScript. A good thing in my eyes.

via Python: World’s Most Popular Language in 2018 | The Mouse Vs. The Python

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Python Lives: Why This Old School Language Keeps Getting More Popular – DZone Big Data

“Simple is better than complex”. One of the Zen rules of Python. A language that gets things done is part of the reason it continues to grow. And it’s not owned by any one company is a plus as well.

via Python Lives: Why This Old School Language Keeps Getting More Popular – DZone Big Data

How Does HIPAA Apply to Wearable Health Technology?

How Does HIPAA Apply to Wearable Health Technology?

I have posted information on this topic before here and here among other places on this blog. My rule of thumb is that if it touches your body and records information about it, it is subject to HIPAA regulations. Knowing that this does not fit the narrative presented by limited government advocates; that is where we are. Until Medicare and Medicaid are brought on board with coverage for wearables, this health benefit will remain a niche product and service.

For additional guidance on creating effective disclosures, check out the FTC’s .com Disclosures report. If you have a health app, don’t forget to consult the mobile health apps interactive tool, the FTC’s best practices guidance for mobile health app developers and the OCR developer portal. And when you’re telling consumers about how you share consumer health information, always remember the FTC Act as well as HIPAA (“Sharing Consumer Health Information?” 2016).

How do HIPAA security and privacy protections apply to wearable health technology and the health data it collects and stores?

Source: How Does HIPAA Apply to Wearable Health Technology? Continue reading

CodeTalk: Rethinking IDE accessibility – Microsoft Research

This is the first I have heard of this, but it is very important for everyone to have the opportunity to develop software and solutions. We are all in this together.

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It is a bright afternoon in the Microsoft Research India lab. Research Fellow, Venkatesh Potluri, sits at his computer, frantically racing against the clock to fix one last bug before the end of the day. The computer blares into his headphones—not music, but a robotic rendition of the code, as Venkatesh uses a program called a screen reader to access applications on his computer [..]

Source: CodeTalk: Rethinking IDE accessibility – Microsoft Research